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[Letter to Clara Breed from Louise Ogawa, Poston, Arizona, October 20, 1942]

Ogawa, Louise [ bio ]

[Letter to Clara Breed from Louise Ogawa, Poston, Arizona, October 20, 1942]
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letter
H: 10 in, W: 8 in (sheet); H: 3.5 in, W: 6.3125 in (envelope)
paper
ink

Poston, Ariz., October 20, 1942

(93.75.31EY)

Gift of Elizabeth Y. Yamada

Description

1 letter and envelope from Louise Ogawa to Clara Breed.

Transcription:
Block 329-13-G/Poston, Arizona/October 20, 1942/Dear Miss McNary,/This is the little black samble Louise wondering how you have been. I haven't written for so long that I'm ashamed of myself. If you happen to see a red glow before your eyes think nothing about it because it's just the reflection from my face. I bet the library is sworming with students./Here in Poston the weather is gradually getting cooler, but it is still hot. In the morning, it is very chilly but as the time ticks away it gets warmer and warmer. I imagine in San Diego it is raining. So far we had 2 rainy days. The funny thing about it was--it was hot from early morn. Towards sunset it became a little windy. Then after supper--6:30 P.M.--the wind blew, the rain poured, the thunder roared, and the lightning flashed. The wind was very strong. It tore down a few doors. Everyone was waiting for the roofs to blow off so they can have wood to make tables, chairs, closets etc. But there was no such luck. Then the next day it was hot again. /School has finally begun. I am a senior now, but I am not sure if I got credit for the last semester. When we graduate, we are going to receive California diplomas. I am taking the following subjects:
1st & 2nd period - Core Studies - History and English (studying history of Poston) teacher - Miss Warvorwsky/3rd period - part time work as reader./4th " - Shorthand II Mr. Nishimoto/5th " - work/6th " - Physiology - Mr. Anderson. Rumors are that he wears a wig./7th & 8th - work./Many of the rooms are not furnished with tables and chairs as yet. So we have to take our own chairs. The lower grades have tables. Most of the teachers are from Oakland, Reedley, San Jose--Miss Waterman, Miss Deen./I am working part time as a reader. Margaret Ishino works too. We sit in the office and wait for teachers to bring in their papers to be corrected. I go to school at 8:00 A.M. thru 12 noon. Then from 1:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. Then I either wash, iron, or play./October 17th, 18th and 19th there was a County Fair which was held in Camp 1. Emi Himaka, Haruko + Kikuye Kawamoto, and I went to the fair on Saturday. We rode on an army truck to Camp 1.Camp 1 does not differ very much from Camp 3. The fair reminded me of a carnival. They had many game booths. And, of course, stands where various foods were sold. Many things were on display. Many future plans were on display too. Many Japanese food are going to be planted. Noodles are already being made in Camp 1. There is a poultry farm too. At present there are 50 chickens. A pork farm is going to be located between Camp 1 and 2. Many things are going to be made here and sold to the outside--exports. The thing I enjoyed the most was the Arts and Craft display. Many clever things were made from trunks and branches of trees. There are many talented people here. I wish you were there to enjoy it with me./As you may have noticed, I have moved. I am now living in Block 329-13-G; Poston, Arizona. I am not living with my step-mother any more so you can imagine how busy I am washing, ironing, cleaning the house, and going to school. I never realized how men can dirty their clothes. I am kept quite busy but I will try to write more often./I suppose you remember about the clothing allowance we were given from the Govt. Well, we finally received them. I received:/1 red bedroom slipper/1 flannel pajama/8 prs. of socks/1 slip/1 wool slacks/I was hoping the skirt and jerkin set would come but to my disappointment it did not. But I am grateful to receive such nice things./I told you in my last letter that we do not have mattresses, but now we have straw mattresses. It softens and warms the bed. My, once I start writing I never seem to stop. It's time for me to go to bed so I'll say good-nite and please take care of yourself since it's getting colder each day./Most sincerely,/Louise Ogawa/

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