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Life Interrupted:
The Japanese American Experience
in World War II Arkansas

A partnership between the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and the Japanese American National Museum with major funding provided by the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation.

EXHIBITION DESCRIPTIONS

Thursday, September 23, 2004

Arts and Crafts from the Camps: The Arkansas Camp Experience
September 23, 2004-November 22, 2004

This artifact exhibit, curated by the UALR Public History Program, about art education in the camps will include items from the private collection of Rosalie Gould. Artistic expression played a vital role in the lives of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. The art produced by inmates in Arkansas offers examples of how people adapt to their surroundings and how art provided an outlet for emotion during an adverse time. This exhibit will be at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Fine Arts Building, Gallery II.

Lasting Beauty:Miss Jamison and the Student Muralists
September 23, 2004-October 15, 2004

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum, this exhibition features three mural paintings by students at Rohwer High School in Arkansas under the guidance of instructor Mabel Rose Jamison Vogel. The paintings tell the story of the Japanese American incarceration from the perspective of the young artists. This exhibition marks the return of the murals to Arkansas and the first time they will be publicly exhibited in nearly sixty years. This exhibition will be at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Fine Arts Building, Gallery I.

Henry Sugimoto: Painting an American Experience
September 23, 2004-November 21, 2004

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum, this exhibition is the first-ever display of the works of a gifted, complex, and engaging artist. Born in 1900 in Japan, Sugimoto's life spanned years in California, Paris, Mexico, Arkansas, and finally New York. His wartime incarceration in Jerome and Rohwer transformed how he viewed himself, his art, and the American experience. This exhibition will be on display at the Cox Creative Arts Center of the Central Arkansas Library System.

Friday, September 24, 2004

Undaunted Courage, Proven Loyalty: Japanese American Soldiers in World War II
September 24, 2004-Fall 2005

This exhibit, curated by the UALR Public History Program, will focus on the military experience of Japanese Americans during World War II including stories from veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and the Military Intelligence Service. To prove their loyalty to the United States government, many Nisei men joined the army as part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team or as part of the Military Intelligence Service. An interactive kiosk of World War II Japanese American veterans will be provided by the Go For Broke Educational Foundation. This exhibit will debut in the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History.

Beyond the Call of Duty: Honoring the 24 Japanese American Medal of Honor Recipients
September 24, 2004-April 1, 2005

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum, this display honors the extraordinary war heroism of Japanese American recipients of the prestigious Medal of Honor, our nation's highest and most rarely awarded Armed Forces decoration. Until 2000, only four Japanese Americans received this honor. That changed when President Clinton presented upgrades to 20 Japanese Americans after a review of their Armed Services records. This display will be in the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History.

Witness: Our Brothers' Keepers
September 24, 2004-April 1, 2005

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum and co-developed with the National Museum of American Jewish Military History, this exhibition tells a story of Japanese Americans and American Jews in the military during World War II who experienced discrimination at home and on the war front. Their experiences intersect in the German countryside in 1945 as they witnessed the liberation of the death camps of the Holocaust, the ultimate consequence of unchecked bigotry. This exhibition will be in the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History.

Against Their Will: The Japanese American Experience in World War II Arkansas
September 24, 2004-November 28, 2004

A new traveling exhibit designed and implemented by the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Public History Program will address life in the Arkansas camps. The exhibit looks at the camps from the Japanese American perspective as well as the perspective of Arkansans who lived near or worked in the camps. Through stories and images, the exhibit will highlight the total camp experience from assembly center to resettlement. The exhibit will debut in the downstairs foyer of the Statehouse Convention Center.

America's Concentration Camps: Remembering the Japanese American Experience
September 24, 2004-November 28, 2004

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum, this compelling exhibition depicts an episode in American history that too few know of or understand -- the mass incarceration of loyal Americans without charge or trial solely on the basis of race. It tells a story of injustice and sorrow, perseverance and courage, through the eyes of those who lived the experience. Silent and silenced for decades, Japanese Americans share their memories in the hopes that the more we learn, the less likely such an injustice will happen again to any other people. The Arkansas premiere of this exhibition will be in the foyer of the Wally Allen Ballroom at the Statehouse Convention Center.

 

 

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