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Saturday, March 17, 2018
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Hiroshima Boy by Naomi Hirahara

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The latest and final installment in the Mas Arai series finds the curmudgeonly detective returning to Hiroshima to bring his best friend’s ashes to a relative. However, Mas quickly becomes embroiled in the mysterious death of a teenage boy, who was about the same age he was when he survived the atomic bomb in 1945.

Join award-winning author Naomi Hirahara for a reading and discussion.

Included with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Hiroshima Boy will be available at the JANM Store. Visit janmstore.com to purchase copies of the other books in the Mas Arai series.

Saturday, March 3, 2018
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II by Richard Cahan and Michael Williams

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Featuring rarely seen photographs by Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Japanese American photographers employed by the US government, Un-American is an extensive documentation of the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The authors used key images from the National Archives and Library of Congress, and then tracked down many of the people in those photographs so that the subjects could share their experiences firsthand. Each photograph is thus seen in the context of a very personal history.

Un-American has been the subject of at least 30 radio shows across the country. It served as the basis of the documentary film And Then They Came for Us as well as a massive exhibition in Chicago. Join the authors for a stimulating discussion of this important book.

Included with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Available at the JANM Store.

Saturday, May 13, 2017
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Relocating Authority by Mira Shimabukuro

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Relocating Authority: Japanese Americans Writing to Redress Mass Incarceration examines the ways Japanese Americans have continually used writing to respond to the circumstances of their community’s mass imprisonment during World War II. It highlights literacy’s enduring potential to participate in social change and assist an imprisoned people in relocating authority away from their captors and back to their community and themselves. Using both Nikkei cultural frameworks and community-specific history for inspiration and guidance, author Mira Shimabukuro shows how writing was used privately and publicly to individually survive and collectively resist the conditions of incarceration.

Join author Mira Shimabukuro for a stimulating talk moderated by Dr. Thomas Fujita-Rony, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies, CSU Fullerton.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Co-sponsored by the Aratani Endowed Chair, UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center.

Available at the JANM Store.

Read an interview with author Mira Shimabukuro about Relocating Authority on Discover Nikkei.

Read a review of Relocating Authority by Arthur A. Hansen on Discover Nikkei.

Saturday, March 25, 2017
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Two Faces of Exclusion by Lon Kurashige

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From the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, the United States has a long history of anti-Asian policies. In his latest book, author and USC Associate Professor of History Lon Kurashige demonstrates that despite widespread racism, Asian exclusion was not the product of an ongoing national consensus; it was a subject of fierce debate.

Two Faces of Exclusion examines the organized and well-funded opposition to discrimination that involved some of the most powerful public figures in American politics, business, religion, and academia. In recovering this opposition, Kurashige explains the rise and fall of exclusionist policies through an unstable and protracted political rivalry, arguing that exclusion-era policies were more than just enactments of racism—they were also catalysts for US-Asian cooperation and the basis for the 21st century’s tightly integrated Pacific world.

Join Kurashige for a stimulating discussion that will include a special focus on events leading up to the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Available at the JANM Store.

Saturday, February 25, 2017
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches by Greg Robinson

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The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches is a collection of biographical portraits of extraordinary but unheralded figures in Japanese American history—men and women who made remarkable contributions in the arts, literature, law, sports, and other fields.

Recovering and celebrating the stories of noteworthy Issei and Nisei and their supporters, the book highlights the diverse experiences and substantial cultural, political, and intellectual contributions of Japanese Americans throughout the country and over multiple decades. Included in these pages are Ayako Ishigaki, Issei feminist and peace activist; Milton Ozaki, mystery writer; Bill Hosokawa, journalist; Wat Misaka, basketball star; Gyo Fujikawa, children’s book artist and author; and Ina Sugihara, interracial activist, to name just a few examples.

Join author and historian Greg Robinson for a discussion of how he came to write the book and how the book functions as an alternative history that shows the unexpected diversity of Japanese American lives. The larger themes of civil rights and making connections among varied groups of people will also be covered.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

This book is available at the JANM Store.

Read a review of this book, including an interview with author Greg Robinson, on Discover Nikkei.

Saturday, June 18, 2016
2:00 PM

Author Discussion and Activist Panel—Serve the People by Karen L. Ishizuka

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Serve the People: Making Asian America in the Long Sixties tells the story of the social and cultural movement that knit disparate communities of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans into a political identity. Drawing on more than 120 interviews and illustrated with striking images from guerrilla publications, the book’s vivid narrative reveals the personal epiphanies and intimate stories of insurgent movers and shakers and ground-level activists alike. Serve the People paints a panoramic landscape of a radical time and aims to be the definitive history of Asian American political consciousness.

Recently honored at JANM’s 2016 Gala Dinner for her pioneering work in establishing the museum’s moving image collection and its Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center, author Karen L. Ishizuka will lead a panel discussion on the Asian American movement in Los Angeles.

Featured will be three activists included in her book: Warren T. Furutani, an educator and politician who is currently in the running for California State Senator; Mike Murase, attorney, current Director of Service Programs for the Little Tokyo Service Center (LTSC), and co-founder of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center; and Qris Yamashita, a graphic designer and artist whose unique graphic style helped to form a visual identity for the Japanese American and Asian Pacific American community. Also joining the panel will be traci kato-kiriyama, artist, educator, community organizer, and co-founder of Tuesday Night Project, a free public program dedicated to presenting AAPI artists and community organizations.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Serve the People is available at the JANM Store.

 

 

 

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