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Friday, September 14, 2018
7:30 PM

ZOCALO—Can U.S. Democracy Survive Russian Information Warfare?

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A Zócalo/Japanese American National Museum Event at JANM’s National Center for the Preservation of Democracy

Moderated by Warren Olney, Host, KCRW’s “To the Point”

American intelligence services have unanimously concluded that the Russian government intervened in the 2016 US elections, and seeks to meddle again this fall. One of Russia’s methods was to use social media to distribute disinformation.

What’s the big-picture strategy behind this style of attack, and how badly is it damaging our society and politics? Does disinformation have lasting effects on how voters engage with democracy? What vulnerabilities in American society did Russia exploit in its disinformation campaign? And how can the U.S. best fight back?

Former FBI counterintelligence special agent and Yale senior lecturer Asha Rangappa, film producer and Russian Media Monitor founder Julia Davis, and Virginia Commonwealth University behavioral scientist and media researcher Caroline Orr visit Zócalo to discuss the power and peril of weaponizing information.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Friday, August 10, 2018
3:00 PM—5:00 PM

Celebrating Japanese American Redress: A Promise for the Future

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PAY WHAT YOU WISH

In honor of the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, join us for an afternoon of reunion, reconnection, and reaffirmation of our commitment to democracy and justice.

JANM President and CEO Ann Burroughs, GFBNEC President and CEO Dr. Mitchell T. Maki, and Karin Wang, Executive Director of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy at UCLA School of Law, will remind us that the fight for civil rights is most successful when done in solidarity across generations and regardless of race, class, gender, or any other single factor of identity.

On this afternoon, the museum will be taking group photos of all those involved in the redress movement of the 1980s as well as those who would like to reaffirm their commitment to democracy today. Following the photos, light refreshments will be served and guests will be invited to pledge their personal commitment to civil liberties by signing our Commitment Banner.

Admission to JANM is Pay What You Wish on this day. RSVPs are strongly recommended using the link below.

Please note that priority seating will be assigned to those who have made reservations in advance. RSVPs will be released 15 minutes before opening, seating thereafter will be first come first served.

Presented in partnership with Go For Broke National Education Center, JACL: Downtown LA Chapter, JACL National, JACL: Pacific Southwest District, Kizuna, Little Tokyo Historical Society, Little Tokyo Community Council, Little Tokyo Service Center, Manzanar Committee, National Veterans Network, Nikkei for Civil Rights & Redress, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, and Visual Communications.

In the George & Sakaye Aratani Central Hall

In conjunction with the exhibition Common Ground: The Heart of Community
Saturday, August 4, 2018
2:00 PM

Reaffirmed Commitment: A Conversation with Norman Y. Mineta

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PAY WHAT YOU WISH

On August 10, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, landmark legislation through which the US government issued an apology and provided monetary compensation to Japanese Americans who had survived America’s concentration camps during World War II.

JANM will commemorate this unprecedented event in our nation’s history with a conversation between the Hon. Norman Y. Mineta and Dr. Mitchell T. Maki, Go For Broke National Education Center President/CEO and author of Achieving the Impossible Dream: How Japanese Americans Achieved Redress.

Presented in partnership with GFBNEC in conjunction with the newly re-installed redress section of Common Ground: The Heart of Community.

Admission to JANM is Pay What You Wish on this day. RSVPs are strongly recommended using the link below.

Please note that priority seating will be assigned to those who have made reservations in advance. RSVPs will be released 15 minutes before opening, seating thereafter will be first come first served.

In the George & Sakaye Aratani Central Hall

In conjunction with the exhibition Common Ground: The Heart of Community
Saturday, August 4, 2018

Memorial for Hiroshima and Nagasaki Atomic Bombings

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Saturday–Thursday, August 4–9

Admission on Saturday, August 4: Pay What You Wish

In commemoration of the World War II atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which occurred on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, we will feature Yoko Ono’s Imagine Peace Wish Tree. Participants can write down their personal wishes for peace on a piece of paper that they tie to the tree.

At the end of the commemoration, the wishes will be collected and mailed to the Imagine Peace Tower in Iceland, Ono’s on-going art project, where wishes from around the world are collected and stored.

Sadako’s Crane will also be on display near the Wish Tree during this period.

In conjunction with the exhibition Sadako’s Crane
Tuesday, July 31, 2018
7:30 PM

ZOCALO—How Can Americans Defend the 14th Amendment When the Government Won't?

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A Zócalo/Daniel K. Inouye Institute Event at JANM’s National Center for the Preservation of Democracy

Introduction by Irene Hirano Inouye, reading from U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye’s keynote address to the 1968 Democratic National Convention

Moderated by Madeleine Brand, Host, KCRW’s “Press Play”

Since its adoption in 1868, the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution has inspired advances in legal rights by guaranteeing U.S. citizens and people in the country “the equal protection of the laws”—except when it hasn’t.

From Jim Crow to the World War II-era incarceration of Japanese Americans, from racist police corruption to bans on interracial and same-sex marriages, American governments—federal, state, and local—have repeatedly and systematically discriminated against people despite the Amendment’s clear promise of equality. How can we defend equal protection when our governments won’t? What does the Amendment’s “equal protection” really protect us from, when equality remains so elusive? And—as this summer marks the 30-year anniversary of the U.S. government’s “redress” apology and compensation for the incarceration of Japanese Americans—how can we best remember the lessons of past violations of the 14th?

Go for Broke president and CEO Mitchell Maki, Johns Hopkins legal historian Martha S. Jones, National Immigration Forum executive director Ali Noorani, and University of Baltimore constitutional law scholar Garrett Epps visit Zócalo to examine the difficulties of enforcing equal protection.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Saturday, July 28, 2018
1:00 PM—4:00 PM

Nikkei Genealogical Society General Meeting

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The Nikkei Genealogical Society (NikkeiGen) promotes, encourages, and shares Nikkei genealogy through education, research, and networking. NikkeiGen’s general meetings are open to anyone who is interested in researching their family trees, learning more about their Japanese roots and heritage, and participating in group discussions and networking. Meetings occur approximately once a month from January to October, with the location alternating between JANM and the Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) in Burbank.

The meeting is included with museum admission. RSVP is required.

To RSVP or for more information, email info@nikkeigenealogicalsociety.org or visit the Facebook page at facebook.com/nikkeigen. Limited to 35 participants.

In the Koichi & Toyo Nerio Education Center

 

 

 

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