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Saturday, July 15, 2017
12:00 PM—5:00 PM

The Asian American ComiCon Presents: A Summit on Art, Action, and the Future

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In 2009, the Asian American ComiCon was held in New York City, bringing together Asian American indie and mainstream comics creators for a historic gathering to celebrate the unique and flourishing graphic storytelling talents of our community. Now, eight years later, AACC is hosting its second event: a Summit on Art, Action, and the Future.

In a time where diversity and creativity are both under attack, the summit will feature diverse creators talking about where we’re going next—creators like Phil Yu (Angry Asian Man, They Call Us Bruce), Jeff Yang (CNN, They Call Us Bruce), Sarah Kuhn (Heroine Complex), LaToya Morgan (writer, Into the Badlands), Lewis Tan (Marvel’s Iron Fist), and Keith Chow (The Nerds of Color). A special keynote conversation will feature the pioneering actor and activist George Takei.

The summit will also see the unveiling of New Frontiers, a brand new graphic anthology of original stories inspired by George Takei’s life and legacy—stories about incarceration and exclusion, representation and resistance, the digital world, and the struggle in the streets. AACC will include an Artists’ Alley where leading comics creators will be available for commissions and signings.

Check the Facebook event page for updates on the event, including schedule.

General admission: $17 ($20 at door)
VIP admission: $47 ($50 at door)—includes reserved seating and a first-run copy of New Frontiers.

JANM MEMBERS
General admission passes: FREE
VIP admission: $30

Limit of four tickets per membership. Contact memberevents@janm.org for members discount code.

AACC is made possible in part by a grant from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.

In conjunction with the exhibition New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei
Thursday, June 15, 2017
6:30 PM—7:30 PM

Moving Day program presented by LTHS

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FREE

Each night through August 11, from sunset to midnight, Moving Day presents outdoor projections of Civilian Exclusion Order posters, which were issued during World War II to inform persons of Japanese ancestry of their impending forced removal and incarceration. The date of each projection will coincide with the original issue date of the order being projected. Projections take place on the façade of the museum’s Historic Building, the site of Los Angeles’ first Buddhist temple and a pickup point for Japanese Americans bound for concentration camps during World War II.

Before tonight’s projections begin, join us and our partner organization Little Tokyo Historical Society for a special public program with three former inmates of the Japanese American World War II camps—Bill Shishima (Heart Mountain), Yukio Kawaratani (Tule Lake), and George Nakano (Jerome, Tule Lake)—who will talk about their experiences in Little Tokyo before the war and how the camp experience changed their lives. Moderated by Instructions to All Persons curator Clement Hanami, JANM’s Vice President of Operations/Art Director.

For a complete schedule of Moving Day programs, visit janm.org/instructions-to-all/movingday.

Thursday, June 8, 2017
7:00 PM

Nick Ut: Beyond the Napalm Girl

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FREE

On June 8, 1972, Associated Press photographer Nick Ut took one of the most iconic images of the 20th century: a crying Vietnamese girl fleeing after a napalm bomb attack. Ut was just 21 years old when he captured that shot, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. The image, however, was just one of tens of thousands of photographs taken during a career that spanned more than 50 years.

Ut retired earlier this year from AP’s Los Angeles bureau, where he was known by virtually every reporter, photographer, cameraman, anchor, and public official. Join ABC7 Eyewitness News anchor David Ono for an intimate talk with Nick Ut about his life beyond “the napalm girl” and the decades he spent chronicling the transformation of LA and America.

This program is currently at capacity, however, a standby line will form in the event that seats become available.

Co-sponsored by Asian American Journalists Association.

Saturday, May 27, 2017
1:00 PM—3:00 PM

Nikkei Genealogical Society General Meeting

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FREE

The Nikkei Genealogical Society (NikkeiGen) promotes, encourages, and shares Nikkei genealogy through education, research, and networking. NikkeiGen’s general meetings are open to anyone who is interested in researching their family trees, learning more about their Japanese roots and heritage, and participating in group discussions and networking. Meetings occur approximately once a month from January to October, with the location alternating between JANM and the Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) in Burbank. Meetings are always free, but RSVP is required.

To RSVP or for more information, email info@nikkeigenealogicalsociety.org or visit the Facebook page at facebook.com/nikkeigen. Limited to 35 participants.

Thursday, May 25, 2017
7:00 PM

Media Coverage of the Japanese American Incarceration and its Lessons for the Trump Era

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FREE

Join Los Angeles Times publisher Davan Maharaj, author and journalist Richard Reeves, author and former Rafu Shimpo editor Naomi Hirahara, and others for a lecture and roundtable discussion on the media’s mistakes during the public hysteria generated by the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the lessons learned for our times.

Space is limited. This program is free, but RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Co-sponsored by Asian American Journalists Association and the Los Angeles Times.

Thursday, May 18, 2017
6:30 PM—7:30 PM

Moving Day program presented by JANM

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Each night through August 11, from sunset to midnight, Moving Day presents outdoor projections of Civilian Exclusion Order posters, which were issued during World War II to inform persons of Japanese ancestry of their impending forced removal and incarceration. The date of each projection will coincide with the original issue date of the order being projected. Projections take place on the façade of the museum’s Historic Building, the site of Los Angeles’ first Buddhist temple and a pickup point for Japanese Americans bound for concentration camps during World War II.

During the run of Moving Day, JANM and several community partners will present a series of dialogues and events grappling with the legacy of the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans. Tonight, before the Moving Day projection begins, join us for a special public program in honor of APA Heritage Month.

The focus of the program will be allyship between Muslim Americans and Japanese Americans, two immigrant communities who have faced and now face similar struggles. Join artists and activists Kathy Masaoka, Sahar Pirzada, Taz Ahmed, traci ishigo, and traci kato-kiriyama for a riveting hour of performance, poetry, and an audience discussion led by Naomi Hirahara. We will consider the critical role that art and storytelling play in the work of building community while involving the audience in the creative process.

For a complete schedule of Moving Day programs, visit janm.org/instructions-to-all/movingday.

 

 

 

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