Dear Miss Breed: Letters from Camp

JAPANESE AMERICAN
NATIONAL MUSEUM
Welcome
Clara Breed
Departure for Camp
Life in Camp
Returning Home
FAQ
 
Daily Life
 
Daily Life | Basic Necessities | Family Separation | Reflections
Letter 1 | Letter 2 | Letter 3
 
 
Graduation
Conditions in the camps and the experiences of the Japanese American inmates varies greatly. The War Relocation Authority (WRA) attempted to create camp communities that resembled normal communities to the greatest extent possible. Thus, each of the 10 camps had schools and hospitals, a newspaper, some degree of democratic self-government and such leisure activities as baseball leagues and movie showings. At the same time, however, life was anything but normal. Japanese American family dynamics were dramatically altered as issei parents saw their authority ebb away with the new found freedom involving granted the nisei.
 
The WRA encourage the resettlement of the "loyal" outside the barbed wire in inland cities like Chicago or Denver and many nisei students were attending college by the end of 1943. However, many of the issei were unwilling to leave, fearing the uncertainty of the outside; many stayed in the camps until well after the war was over and had to be evicted as the camps closed.




Daily Life | Basic Necessities | Family Separation | Reflections
Welcome | Clara Breed | Departure for Camp | Life in Camp | Returning Home | FAQ |

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