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 Japanese American National Museum
Traveling Exhibitions

Traveling Exhibitions

The Japanese American National Museum offers many of the exhibitions it has hosted to other museums and cultural facilities. These exhibitions range in size and subject matter, offering engaging experiences for visitors of all ages and with varied interests.

Please refer to the contact information for each exhibition for availability information, loan fees, and other details.

 

Currently Available for Booking

 


Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection

While conducting research for a book about art and craft objects created by Japanese Americans during World War II, author Allen Hendershott Eaton amassed a significant collection of such camp artifacts. More than 60 years later, in 2015, a controversial attempt by a private party to auction the artifacts was averted by Japanese American community leaders and activists. Ultimately, the Eaton Collection was transferred to the Japanese American National Museum for safekeeping and conservation.

The museum is now actively seeking input from the community about the items in the collection through a traveling pop-up display and accompanying workshops. The display includes physical or digital representation of every item in the collection—more than 400 individual photographs, sculptures, paintings and watercolors, jewelry items, vases, beads, nameplates, and other items handmade by Japanese Americans while enduring incarceration in the WWII camps. Contested Histories is intended to help gather information about each individual object so that the museum’s efforts to preserve and catalog the collection can be as complete as possible. Camp survivors and their family members and friends are encouraged to share with JANM information they know or remember about the objects, including who is depicted in the many photographs.

Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection was on display at the Japanese American National Museum January 7 – April 8, 2018.

Download the Contested Histories Travel Fact Sheet >>

Visit janm.org/contested-histories for more information about the Eaton Collection, the pop-up display, and travel schedule.

 

Hello Kitty x Japanese American National Museum

Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty

The Japanese American National Museum presents Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty, the first large-scale Hello Kitty museum retrospective in the United States.

Organized as part of the global icon’s 40th-anniversary celebrations, the exhibition examines the colorful history of Hello Kitty and her influence on popular culture. Hello! includes an extensive product survey, with rare and unique items from the Sanrio archives, alongside a selection of innovative contemporary artworks inspired by Hello Kitty and her world.

This exhibition was first displayed at the Japanese American National Museum from October 11, 2014 to May 31, 2015.

Please visit www.epicexhibitions.com/project-hellokitty for booking information.

Visit the exhibition site for more information, including upcoming venues, artist bios, and related merchandise.

 

Private Mitsuo Sakamoto, Maritime Alps, 1944. Sus Ito Collection, JANM.

Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito’s World War II Images

Susumu “Sus” Ito’s World War II photographs document his tour of duty through Europe as a member of the celebrated all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team’s 522nd Field Artillery Battalion.

While Ito participated in such dramatic events as the rescue of the Lost Battalion and the liberation of a subcamp of Dachau, these rare and breathtaking images, taken with a prohibited camera, capture the humble daily lives of young Japanese American soldiers serving in a segregated unit. Theu are seen posing next to their jeeps, walking in the snow, swimming in a river, playing chess, and even visiting tourist destinations while on leave.

Ito went to great lengths to preserve the negatives, carrying his photos nearly 5,000 miles across Europe and having his film developed at villages along the way. Unseen for decades, these images provide a fresh look into the soldiers’ lives typically not found in history books.

Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito’s World War II Images is the first in JANM’s Sharing Our Stories series of exhibitions drawn from the museum’s extensive permanent collection.

This exhibition was first displayed at the Japanese American National Museum from July 14 – September 6, 2015, and is available for 12-week booking periods.

Download the Before They Were Heroes Traveling Exhibition Fact Sheet >>

Visit the exhibition site for more information, including photographs and a video.

 

Tattoo by Horikiku
Tattoo by Horikiku. Photo by Kip Fulbeck.

Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in the Modern World

Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World is a groundbreaking photographic exhibition that explores the master craftsmanship of traditional Japanese tattoos and their enduring influence on modern tattoo practices.

Even as Japanese-style tattooing has moved into the mainstream, it remains an enigmatic and misunderstood art form. Much of Japanese society denounces it as a criminal practice, associating it more with some of its yakuza clientele than with its respected artists. Western practitioners and aficionados, on the other hand, often lack knowledge of the practice’s long history, reducing it to an exotic form of decoration.

Perseverance aims to shift the conversation around Japanese tattoo practice by examining it as a serious art form, placing it in a rich artistic lineage that includes ukiyo-e and other traditional Japanese printing techniques. The exhibition also looks at the vibrancy of current Japanese-style tattoo work, which includes hybrid styles developed by practitioners in Japan, Europe, and the United States.

Designed by artist Kip Fulbeck and curated by master tattoo artist and author Takahiro Kitamura, Perseverance is the first exhibition of its kind and features stunning color photographs by Fulbeck of the work of seven internationally acclaimed tattoo artists: Horishiki (Chris Brand), Horitaka, Horitomo, Junii, Miyazo, Shige, and Yokohama Horiken, along with additional images of works by other artists. These works represent the diverse spectrum of Japanese-style tattooing today.

This exhibition was first displayed at the Japanese American National Museum from March 8 – September 14, 2014, and is available for 12-week booking periods.

Download the Perseverance Traveling Exhibition Fact Sheet >>

Visit the exhibition site for more information, including artist bios, videos, and subsequent venues.

 

part asian, 100% hapa

kip fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa

Organized by the Japanese American National Museum, kip fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa is an exhibition of portraits by award-winning filmmaker and artist Kip Fulbeck.

Originally a derogatory label derived from the Hawaiian word for half, the word Hapa has been embraced as a term of pride by many whose mixed-race heritage includes Asian or Pacific Rim ancestry. Fulbeck’s work seeks to address in words and images the one question that Hapa are frequently asked: “What are you?” By pairing portraits of Hapa—unadorned by make-up, jewelry, or clothing—with their handwritten statements on who they are, Fulbeck has produced powerful yet intimate expressions of beauty and identity.

kip fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa is Fulbeck’s attempt to explore Hapa, who now number in the millions, and offers a complex perspective on the changing makeup of contemporary America.

This exhibition was first displayed at the Japanese American National Museum from June–October 2006.

Download the kip fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa Traveling Exhibition Fact Sheet >>

Visit the JANM exhibition site for more information and subsequent venues.

 

 

 

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