Resources

“The need to learn more about our past continues to be an ongoing challenge for us all.”
Lynette K. Oshima, Ed.D.
University of New Mexico

The Enduring Communities project is but one of many efforts by the National Museum that gives K-12 students the unique opportunity to explore their own heritage and culture by learning the lessons of the past. Through its educational programs and resources both on and off-site, the National Museum is able to offer an in-depth perspective and information on this important chapter in our history.

Life Interrupted: The Japanese American Experience in World War II Arkansas

During World War II, more than 16,000 Japanese Americans were held in camps at Jerome and Rohwer. Sixty years later, the National Museum piloted the successful project, Life Interrupted, that produced training for more than 800 educators and developed new curricula for over 70,000 students about the Japanese American World War II Arkansas experience. The project also culminated with a national conference in September, 2004 where more than 1,300 people embarked on a transformative journey to Little Rock, Arkansas to examine and reflect upon the Japanese American incarceration in Arkansas. The National Museum created a DVD entitled, Life Interrupted, Reunion & Remembrance in Arkansas, documenting this project. Click here to purchase at the Museum Store.

Discover Nikkei Resources

DiscoverNikkei.org is an award-winning Web project of the Japanese American National Museum that provides an interactive global space for Nikkei-related community and personal stories through a variety of mediums including video interviews, articles, and photographs. Click here to see a listing of related articles and other resources available on Discover Nikkei.

Other available resources:

  • Redress Remembered - National Museum programs and resources commemorating the 20th Anniversary of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988
  • Yae Aihara - former camp inmate of Crystal City, Texas
  • Wat Misaka - lived in pre-WWII Utah
  • George Sakato - voluntarily relocated to Glendale, Arizona