Historical Timeline of Japanese Peruvian

Contents

Project Description

Scholars

Institutional Participants

Resources
Demographics1
Demographics2
Overview
Timelines
Directories

Symposium

Staff and Advisors

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1873
The Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Commerce and Navigation is signed between Peru and Japan.
 
1898
The Peruvian government issues a decree authorizing immigration of Japanese workers to Peru.
 
1899
The first group of Japanese immigrants (790) arrives in Callao to work as contract laborers on sugar plantations in the coastal region of Peru.
 
1923
The contract labor of Japanese immigrants is abolished by mutual agreement between Japanese companies and coastal plantation enterprises.
 
1930s
Decrees are promulgated that restrict immigration and impair the economic activities of Japanese immigrants. The daily newspaper La Prensa develops an anti-Japanese campaign under the title "The Japanese Infiltration," with the participation of Peruvian politicians and intellectuals.
 
1940
"Saqueo" (Riot) erupts against Japanese commercial and residential establishments.
 
1941
The Pacific War begins on December 8.
 
Issuance of the Supreme Resolution (Resolución Suprema) freezes the funds of Japanese individuals and associations.
 
1942
Peru breaks diplomatic relations with Italy, Germany, and Japan. Restrictions on commercial and financial activities are imposed on foreign nationals of the "Axis" countries (Japanese, Italians and Germans). The government confiscates businesses and properties of the Japanese, including schools. The deportation of the Japanese to internment camps in the United States commences.
 
1945
The Peruvian government officially declares war on Japan.
 
The Pacific War ends on August 14.
 
1955
The Japanese Central Society (Sociedad Central Japonesa), an association that represents the Japanese Peruvian community since 1917, resumes its activities.
 
The Peruvian government issues the Supreme Decree that suspends the freezing of Japanese assets.
 
1960
The entrance of the Japanese to Peru is once again permitted, although restrictive quotas of 150 individuals per year are imposed and conditions of direct kinship with residents in Peru.
 
1965
The Peruvian government gives the Japanese Central Society 10,000 square meters of land as compensation for the expropriation of several buildings belonging to Japanese institutions during World War II. The Peruvian-Japanese Cultural Center (Centro Cultural Peruano Japonés) is subsequently constructed.
 
1987
Massive emigration of Japanese Peruvians to Japan (dekasegi phenomenon) begins.
 
1990
Alberto Fujimori is elected to President of Peru and reelected five years later.