Japanese American National Museum
Events Calendar

Calendar of Events — March 2018

All programs are free for JANM members and included with admission for non-members, unless otherwise noted. Events are subject to change.

Reservations are recommended for most programs; you may use the links below. You may also RSVP by emailing or calling 213.625.0414 at least 48 hours in advance. Please indicate the name, date, and time of the program, as well as your name and the number of people in your party. (RSVPs are not accepted for Family Festivals).

For all ticketed events (classes, workshops, food tours, etc.), pre-payment is required to hold your space. Cancellations must be made 48 hours in advance or no refund will be issued.

Thursday, March 1, 2018
7:30 PM

Why Is the Modern World So Angry?


American mass shooters. Islamic terrorists. Vengeful nationalists. Racist presidents. Social media misogynists. In today’s world, paranoid hatred—and the wrath of the people who spread it—is inescapable. Where does all the rage come from?

Join Zocalo and JANM at the Tateuchi Democracy Forum for a discussion with Panjak Mishra, author of Age of Anger: A History of the Present for a discussion moderated by Gregory Rodriguez, founder and Editor-in-Chief of Zócalo Public Square. Mishra locates the answer, paradoxically, in modernity’s successes.

As the world has become more closely linked via mass politics and technology and the pursuit of wealth, those unable to enjoy the fruits of progress have been cast adrift, uprooted from older traditions. Many have responded by lashing out at elites, by inventing enemies, attempting to recreate an imaginary golden age, and seeking self-empowerment through apocalyptic rhetoric and spectacular violence. What is the attraction of cultural supremacism and rancorous brutality in this age? What does the history of previous transitions in global politics and technology tell us about how to manage the backlash? And what does this moment require—in terms of new thinking—if humanity is to survive its own anger? Mishra visits Zócalo to explore the paradoxical perils of freedom, stability, and prosperity.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Saturday, March 3, 2018
12:00 PM—3:00 PM

Hinamatsuri Workshop: Kokeshi Doll Art with Mari Inukai



In celebration of Hinamatsuri (Girls’ Day), paint your own prince and princess kokeshi doll set with artist Mari Inukai. Bring pictures of your favorite flowers and textile samples as reference material to paint your doll’s kimono. All generations welcome!

Limited to 10 participants, however, to encourage collaboration, guests who wish to work together may sign up as a single participant; each participant group/team will then receive one set of dolls to work on, and pay a single participant fee.

$20 members, $25 non-members. Museum admission included. Limited to 10 participants. If you have questions, please contact

This program is sold out. To be placed on a waitlist, please email

This workshop is made possible in part by a grant from the City of Los Angeles, Department of Cultural Affairs.

In the Koichi & Toyo Nerio Education Center

Saturday, March 3, 2018
12:15 PM

Members Only Learning at Lunch: Hinamatsuri


Bring a brown bag lunch and join JANM collections staff as they look at a selection of artifacts focused on the history and traditions of Hinamatsuri (Girls’s Day).

Space is limited. RSVP by February 27 using the link below. You can also contact or 213.830.5646.

In the Nancy K. Araki Community Education Center

Saturday, March 3, 2018
1:00 PM

Common Ground Exhibition Tour


Tour the ongoing exhibition Common Ground: The Heart of Community with JANM’s knowledgeable docents.

Included with museum admission.

In conjunction with the exhibition Common Ground: The Heart of Community
Saturday, March 3, 2018
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II by Richard Cahan and Michael Williams


Featuring rarely seen photographs by Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Japanese American photographers employed by the US government, Un-American is an extensive documentation of the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The authors used key images from the National Archives and Library of Congress, and then tracked down many of the people in those photographs so that the subjects could share their experiences firsthand. Each photograph is thus seen in the context of a very personal history.

Un-American has been the subject of at least 30 radio shows across the country. It served as the basis of the documentary film And Then They Came for Us as well as a massive exhibition in Chicago. Join the authors for a stimulating discussion of this important book.

Included with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Available at the JANM Store.

Saturday, March 17, 2018
1:00 PM

Members Only Meet-and-Greet with Naomi Hirahara


All members are invited to congratulate Naomi Hirahara on the completion of her popular Mas Arai mystery series prior to the author discussion about her book, Hiroshima Boy.

Space is limited. RSVP by March 13 using the link below. You can also contact or 213.830.5646.

In the Koichi & Toyo Nerio Education Center

Saturday, March 17, 2018
2:00 PM

Author Discussion—Hiroshima Boy by Naomi Hirahara


The latest and final installment in the Mas Arai series finds the curmudgeonly detective returning to Hiroshima to bring his best friend’s ashes to a relative. However, Mas quickly becomes embroiled in the mysterious death of a teenage boy, who was about the same age he was when he survived the atomic bomb in 1945.

Join award-winning author Naomi Hirahara for a reading and discussion.

Included with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum

Hiroshima Boy will be available at the JANM Store. Visit to purchase copies of the other books in the Mas Arai series.

Saturday, March 24, 2018
11:00 AM—4:00 PM

Two-Day Workshop: Shibori On! Continuing Explorations in Shibori and Indigo



Saturday–Sunday, March 24–25
11 a.m.–4 p.m.

In this two-day workshop, continue working with indigo and shibori dyeing using a broad selection of beautiful fabrics, both vintage and unique. Shibori techniques of itajime, arashi, nui, and more will be practiced with both new and continuing students.

Participants will also dye threads for stitching and explore some of the things that can be made with hand-dyed indigo shibori fabrics. Continuing students are encouraged to bring past work to share with beginning students.

Please wear studio clothing and bring rubber gloves, scissors, and a seam ripper. All other materials will be provided. $72 members, $90 non-members, plus $40 materials fee due to instructor at beginning of class (cash only). Limited to 20 participants. Museum admission included.

This program is sold out. To be placed on a waitlist, please email

In the Koichi & Toyo Nerio Education Center

Saturday, March 31, 2018
10:15 AM—12:15 PM

Little Tokyo Walking Tour


Relive history and learn about present-day Little Tokyo with JANM docents.

$12 members, $15 non-members. Museum admission included. Comfortable walking shoes recommended. Weather permitting. Limited to 20 participants.

Saturday, March 31, 2018
11:00 AM—4:30 PM

Discover Your Japanese American Roots


This comprehensive workshop led by genealogy buff Chester Hashizume will teach you to identify your ancestral Japanese hometown, uncover the meanings behind family crests and surnames, learn about conducting research in Japan, and much more.

$44 members, $55 non-members. Materials and museum admission included. Limited to 16 participants.

In the Koichi & Toyo Nerio Education Center

Saturday, March 31, 2018
2:00 PM

Film Screening and Discussion—Proof of Loyalty: Kazuo Yamane and the Nisei Soldiers of Hawai‘i


With a population that included a significant percentage of persons of Japanese ancestry, the state of Hawaii did not experience the mass incarcerations that Japanese Americans on the West Coast did following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Only a small percentage of the islands’ Japanese Americans were sent to prison camps, and large numbers of the state’s Nisei volunteered for and served with distinction in the US Army.

The 2017 documentary film Proof of Loyalty tells the compelling story of one of those soldiers, Kazuo Yamane. Educated as a child in Hawaii and eventually graduating from Japan’s prestigious Waseda University, Yamane was drafted into the US Army just before the Pearl Harbor attack. With his strong Japanese language skills, he was plucked from the infantry ranks to serve first at the Pentagon, then at a secret facility in northern Maryland, and finally under Eisenhower in Europe. Most importantly, he would identify a secret document that would significantly help America’s war in the Pacific.

A Q&A with Lucy Ostrander, one of the two filmmakers behind the film, will follow the screening. Presented with Go For Broke National Education Center (GFBNEC). Free for JANM and GFBNEC members and included with admission to JANM or GFBNEC. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

In the Tateuchi Democracy Forum



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