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Events Calendar

Film Screenings Past Events

 

Sunday, March 6, 2011
2:00 PM—5:00 PM

Border Crossings: An ongoing exploration of community and society through cinema and media arts Presented by Visual Communications

events/VCLogo.jpg Visual Communications, the nation’s premier Asian Pacific American media arts center, is pleased to inaugurate an ongoing series at the Tateuchi Democracy Forum. Select works ranging from politics to horror, from live-action to anime and everything else in between will be augmented with shoptalks and special guest appearances.

Nikkei Overseas (double-feature):

Overstay (1998) Director: Ann Kaneko
Overstay foregrounds the lives of foreign migrant workers in Japan. Four sets of young people from Iran, Pakistan, Peru, and the Philippines tell their unique stories—why they came to Japan, what struggles they have faced, and how they have adjusted to an unusually insular and traditional society.

Against the Grain: An Artist’s Survival Guide To Perú (2007) Director: Ann Kaneko
Spanning two decades of corrupt governments and inept leadership in Perú, Against the Grain tells the story of four inspiring artists—one displaced by rebel insurgents, another a Japanese Peruvian targeted by the regime, and others whose works comment on youth culture and religion—and their struggles to persevere and make art in Perú.

Presented in partnership with Visual Communications. For more information about Visual Communications, visit www.vconline.org/.

Saturday, February 26, 2011
2:00 PM—4:00 PM

Mendez Vs. Westminster: For All the Children by Sandra Robbie

events/Mendez100.jpg Seven years before Brown v. Board of Education, Mendez vs. Westminster began the unraveling of school segregation in the U.S. Among many surprises, two key persons played important roles in both cases: NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall, who later argued and won Brown v. Board of Education; and then-Governor Earl Warren who signed the World War II internment order that sent 120,000 Japanese Americans to U.S. concentration camps. A few years later, Warren desegregated California schools as result of Mendez v. Westminster. In 1954, Supreme Court Justice Warren ended segregation across the U.S. with the unanimous Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education.

Find out how one Japanese American family played a pivotal role in this historic case in this enlightening documentary. There will be a Q&A after the screening with the filmmaker.

Saturday, February 5, 2011
2:00 PM—4:00 PM

Valor With Honor by Burt Takeuchi

events/442nd_Italy__POWs_jpeg_ValorwHonor100.jpg Valor with Honor is an independent documentary film based on over 35 interviews of Japanese American veterans who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II.

This small segregated unit of 3500 men is the most decorated American unit for its size and length of service. By the end of WW2, the 442nd would be awarded with seven Presidential Unit Citations, 21 Medals of Honor (upgraded from DSC), over 500 Silver Stars, and over 9000 Purple Hearts. The 85 minute feature film tells the harrowing stories of 442nd's battles in Italy, the Lost Battalion Rescue in France, the assault up Mount Folgorito, and witness to the holocaust at Dachau, Germany at the close of WW2. The film concludes with the vets bittersweet return home to America. The entire film is woven through stories told by the veterans themselves.

There will be a Q&A after the screening with the filmmaker.

Saturday, September 18, 2010
6:00 PM—10:00 PM

In Collaboration with Bringing The Circle Together and The National Center for the Preservation of Democracy: A Free Screening of Ixoq

Ixoq documents the struggles of women during the armed conflict as well as their current efforts to build an inclusive society where they can participate. Mayan musical guests Princesas del Mundo Maya, will begin the night, and following the film Felipe Perez (the filmmaker) and IxchelMultimedia (producer) will speak about the film.

Sponsors for the night include Hecho de Mano Mayan Culture, Japanese American National Museum, Bird man Pet Shop, Department of Cultural Affairs.

Background, Guatemala, a country where wealth has historically been held in the hands of a small number of families, has been governed by one set of descendents of the Spaniards one after another. Yet the majority Mayan population, in different eras and under varying conditions, has risen up to change this situation of slavery and poverty. The Mayans survived the first holocaust of our history. But in the late 1970s, when Guatemala’s armed opposition took root in Mayan territory, an extermination policy was unleashed. Referred to as the second holocaust, it had atrocities that reached alarming levels towards the end of the last century, as the country’s 36-year civil war drew to a close (1960-1996). Official statistics record 626 massacres, including 440 Mayan communities wiped off the map, the death of more than 200,000 persons, and the disappearance of another 450,000. 50,000 widows and 500,000 orphans were left behind, and more than one million human beings were displaced. Mayan peoples accounted for 83% of the fully identified victims.

The current situation for the Mayan peoples shows little progress. 48% of the Mayan population over the age of 15 is illiterate. 51% of the Guatemalan population is female. Illiteracy among Mayan women is 76%. On an average, Mayan women who are able to read and write have only one year of schooling. Each year 100,000 Mayan children enter the labor force, 56.4% of whom are between the age of 5 and 14.

Sponsors for the night include Hecho de Mano Mayan Culture, Japanese American National Museum, Bird man Pet Shop, Department of Cultural Affairs.
Thursday, April 22, 2010
7:00 PM—10:00 PM

Bringing the Circle Together: Broken Rainbow

events/colorturtlesmall__.jpg Free Screening of Broken Rainbow

The heartbreaking tale of the forced relocation of 12,000 Navajos from their ancestral homeland in Arizona that began in the 1970s and continues to this day. Broken Rainbow bears witness to the machinations of energy companies and their government proxies as they eagerly cast aside the peaceful Navajo to make way for oil, gas, uranium and coal exploration. In their own words, elders and outside experts discuss the rich culture and the history of the Navajo as well as their close friends and neighbors the Hopi. The film follows these Native Americans as they take their protest to Congress and join with the American Indian Movement. Narrated by Emmy-winning actor Martin Sheen. Guests to TBA.

Bringing the Circle Together: A Native American Film Series

Bringing the Circle Together: A Native American Film Series is a FREE monthly film series located in downtown Los Angeles at the National Center for Preservation of Democracy. Directly across from our host sponsor, the Japanese American National Museum. The film series was established to provide quality documentaries by and about Indigenous cultures of the Americas, and bring together a central gathering place where discussion and awareness of issues can be shared with the Native community and its supporters.

The film series is held at the National Center for Preservation of Democracy located at 111 North Central Avenue, between 1st Street and Central Avenue, in downtown Los Angeles. The NCPD can be reached via train, bus, or parking in the area. Screenings will begin at 7pm, and it is advisable to arrive at least 15-20 minutes prior for seating. Each film will include a raffle at the end of the screening. (pdf for directions). Doors open at 6:30pm.

The film series is hosted by Lorin Morgan-Richards and is generously sponsored by the following organizations:

The Japanese American National Museum
Department of Cultural Affairs
American Indian Community Council
InterTribal Entertainment
Hecho de Mano
Nahui Ohlin

For more information about the film series please visit www.myspace.com/nafilmseries
or by email at nafilmseries@aol.com

Thursday, March 18, 2010
7:00 PM—10:00 PM

Bringing the Circle Together: Juchitan Queer Paradise

events/100colorturtlesmall____________________.jpg
A free screening of Juchitan Queer Paradise, with a special short film entitled Two-Spirit People in the Modern World

In collaboration with Bringing The Circle Together, the Red Circle Project at AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA) will be hosting a free night of documentary films: 'Two-Spirit People in the Modern World', a short film by Mike Garrido and Tarek Tohme and 'Juchitan Queer Paradise' by Patricio Henriquez. This important event will take place on Thursday, March 18, 2010 with a reception and screening at 7pm. Please visit www.apla.org/redcircleproject to RSVP for the event. Please contact me with any questions at 213-201-1311 or enaswood@apla.org

About the feature film 'Juchitan Queer Paradise': Juchitan is a Zapotec village in Mexico near the Guatemalan border. Here homosexuality is fully accepted; gays are simply a third gender. If a boy shows a predisposition to homosexuality his family will rejoice and be thankful for receiving what is considered a blessing. In Juchitan a man who wants to be a woman only has to dress like a woman to be considered and treated as a woman by the entire community. The film profiles three gay people: a teacher, a hairdresser and a shop owner.

March 20th, 2010 marks the fourth year of honoring National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. March 20th was selected by Native communities to commemorate National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day because it marks the start of spring, a time of beginnings and change. In Native cultures, seasons define the cycle and celebration of life. This day will serve as an opportunity to increase awareness of the impact of HIV/AIDS on Native Americans and Alaska Natives (NA/AN).

Bringing the Circle Together: A Native American Film Series

Bringing the Circle Together: A Native American Film Series is a FREE monthly film series located in downtown Los Angeles at the National Center for Preservation of Democracy. Directly across from our host sponsor, the Japanese American National Museum. The film series was established to provide quality documentaries by and about Indigenous cultures of the Americas, and bring together a central gathering place where discussion and awareness of issues can be shared with the Native community and its supporters.

The film series is held at the National Center for Preservation of Democracy located at 111 North Central Avenue, between 1st Street and Central Avenue, in downtown Los Angeles. The NCPD can be reached via train, bus, or parking in the area. Screenings will begin at 7pm, and it is advisable to arrive at least 15-20 minutes prior for seating. Each film will include a raffle at the end of the screening. (pdf for directions). Doors open at 6:30pm.

The film series is hosted by Lorin Morgan-Richards and is generously sponsored by the following organizations:

The Japanese American National Museum
Department of Cultural Affairs
American Indian Community Council
InterTribal Entertainment
Hecho de Mano
Nahui Ohlin

For more information about the film series please visit www.myspace.com/nafilmseries
or by email at nafilmseries@aol.com

 

 

 

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