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Film Screenings Past Events

 

Saturday, October 29, 2016
2:00 PM

Film Screening—Tatau: Marks of Polynesia Documentary

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Made by the organizers of Tatau: Marks of Polynesia, this documentary film explores the history of the 2,000-year-old art form as well as the influential Su‘a Sulu‘ape family and their mission to preserve the practice of traditional Samoan tattooing, providing insight into the origins of the art form.

The film includes exclusive interviews with Samoan Head of State Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Ta‘isi Efi, Prime Minister of Samoa Tuila‘epa Lupesoliai Neioti Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi, renowned athlete Zita Martel, and tattoo artists Su‘a Sulu‘ape Alaiva‘a Petelo, Su‘a Sulu‘ape Peter, Su‘a Sulu‘ape Paul Jr., Su‘a Sulu‘ape Aisea Toetu‘u, Sulu‘ape Steve Looney, Tuigamala Andy Tauafiafi, Mike Fatutoa, and Sulu‘ape Si‘i Liufau.

Screening will be followed by a panel discussion with director John Agcaoili, exhibition curator Takahiro “Ryudaibori” Kitamura, and several artists featured in the film.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Image: Tattoo by Su‘a Sulu‘ape Alaiva‘a Petelo. Photo by John Agcaoili.

In conjunction with the exhibition Tatau: Marks of Polynesia
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
7:30 PM

Film Screening and Q&A with Steve Aoki—I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead

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FREE

Join us for a special screening of I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead, a new documentary on the life of influential DJ, music producer, and record label founder Steve Aoki.

A heart-pumping and at times heartbreaking film, I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead was shot over the course of three years, during the making of Aoki’s 2014 Neon Future double album. As it follows Aoki’s journey to play the biggest show of his career, the film tackles his complex yet loving relationship with his father, legendary Benihana restaurant tycoon Rocky Aoki, and his struggle growing up Japanese American in Southern California during the 1980s and ’90s. This bittersweet film reveals how the weight of parental expectations paired with the search for personal identity created one of the most prominent Asian Americans in pop culture today.

I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead premiered to a sold-out audience at the Tribeca Film Festival this past spring and was released on Netflix on August 19. Screening will be followed by a Q&A with Steve Aoki, moderated by musician and producer Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park.

Space is limited; RSVPs are required using the link below.

THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT
If you RSVP’d, we recommend you arrive early. Seats are first come, first serve. Doors open at 7 p.m. There will be a stand-by line starting at 6 p.m. Unclaimed seats will be released at 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 23, 2016
2:00 PM

Film Screening and Panel Discussion—Sleeping on Potatoes: A Lumpy Adventure from Manzanar to the Corporate Tower

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The late Dr. Kaworu Carl Nomura was a brilliant Nisei physicist involved in some of the most notable technological advances of the 20th century, including the commercial production of silicon wafers for computer memory chips. In this short documentary shot by Ellen Frick in the later years of Nomura’s life, the scientist reflects on the social injustices he faced and his efforts to make a difference in the lives of others.

Screening will be followed by a panel discussion on Nomura’s life and contributions to society, featuring Carl’s daughter Teri Nomura and his nephew Art Nomura.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Co-sponsored by the Port Townsend Film Festival.

Saturday, May 14, 2016
2:00 PM

Film Screening—Toyo Miyatake: Infinite Shades of Gray

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FREE

A screening of the award-winning film by JANM’s own Watase Media Arts Center about renowned photographer Toyo Miyatake. Miyatake’s thriving practice as a Little Tokyo–based portrait and art photographer was put on pause when he was incarcerated during World War II. However, smuggling a lens and film holder into camp, Miyatake made history by becoming one of the first to photograph the Japanese American concentration camp experience from the inside. Introduced by Making Waves curator Dennis Reed.

This film is available at the JANM Store.

Read an interview with filmmakers Karen Ishizuka and Robert Nakamura about the film and Toyo Miyatake on Discover Nikkei.

Saturday, April 2, 2016
2:00 PM

Film Screening and Panel Discussion—The Empty Chair

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In 1942, Alaska native John Tanaka was going to be the valedictorian of his high school graduating class, but was scheduled to be incarcerated by the U.S. government before the ceremony could take place. In response, the Juneau school board voted to hold a special early graduation ceremony for him. When the official ceremony was held for the class of ’42, they set aside an empty chair on the platform to acknowledge Tanaka’s absence. Tanaka went on to volunteer for service in the all-Japanese American 442 Regimental Combat Team while his family remained in an American concentration camp.

The Empty Chair is a unique documentary film composed of interviews of survivors from that period, rare historical photos, never-before-seen archival footage, U.S. government documentaries, and historical accounts. All of these sources are woven together to draw the viewer back into this little-known chapter of American history. Panel with the filmmakers to follow the screening.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

Read more about this film on Discover Nikkei.

Saturday, March 26, 2016
2:00 PM

Film Screening and Panel Discussion—To Climb a Gold Mountain

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In honor of Women’s History Month, JANM presents To Climb a Gold Mountain (2015), a documentary that tells the story of Los Angeles through the eyes of four immigrant Chinese women.

Covering a span of 160 years, each woman featured in the film faced a different set of challenges, fighting in her own unique way to make a difference. Included are Anna May Wong, a groundbreaking actress who achieved success and fame, and Sing Ye, a little-known prostitute who lived in the 1800s and fought for freedom.

A thought-provoking film, To Climb a Gold Mountain seeks to address contemporary issues of immigration, violence against women, and cross-cultural relations by reflecting on the struggles of the past. Panel discussion with the filmmakers to follow the screening.

Free with museum admission. RSVPs are recommended using the link below.

 

 

 

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