Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection

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ContestedHistories

Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection originated at the Japanese American National Museum and was on display January 7 – April 8, 2018. The pop-up display is now traveling to other venues. See below for information about confirmed venues and dates. Please check back for updated schedule.

Interested in booking this display? JANM is currently looking for locations in the central valley of California, San Diego county, and parts of Arizona. Download the Contested Histories travel fact sheet or email Clement Hanami at chanami@janm.org for more information.

 

POP-UP DISPLAY SITES

 

Current/Upcoming Venues

Please check back for additional venues.

 

Past Venues

 

The Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California

June 23–24, 2018
FREE and open to the public

Saturday: 9 a.m.–6:30 p.m.; workshop: 5:30 p.m.–6:15 p.m.
Sunday: 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; workshop: 3:30 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

1840 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA 94115

Web: jcccnc.org
Phone: 415.567.5505

 

Tule Lake Pilgrimage 2018: Preserving Our Hallowed Ground

June 29 – July 1, 2018
(Pilgrimage dates: June 29 – July 2)

Open only to pilgrimage attendees. Registration is now closed.

Friday: 4 p.m.–10 p.m.
Saturday: 6 p.m.–10 p.m.
Sunday: 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; workshop: 3:30 p.m.–5 p.m.

Union Peak Lounge, Oregon Institute of Technology
3201 Campus Dr.
Klamath Falls, OR 97601

Email: info@tulelake.org
Web: tulelake.org/pilgrimage

 

2018 Minidoka Pilgrimage

July 6, 2018
9 a.m.–5 p.m.
(Pilgrimage dates: July 5–8)

Open only to pilgrimage attendees.
Please register at their website: minidokapilgrimage.org

College of Southern Idaho, Fine Arts Building
Falls Avenue
Twin Falls, ID 83301

Email: minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com

 

Japanese American Museum of San Jose

July 12–15, 2018
12 p.m.–4 p.m.
Included with museum admission

Workshop: July 12: 6 p.m.

535 North Fifth St.
San Jose, CA 95112

Web: jamsj.org
Phone: 408.294.3138

 

2018 Heart Mountain Pilgrimage

July 27–28, 2018
(Pilgrimage dates: July 26–28)

Open only to pilgrimage attendees. Deadline to register: June 30
Purchase tickets at shopheartmountain.org/pilgrimage or by phone at 307.754.8000.

Friday: 9 a.m.–7 p.m.; workshop: 2:30 p.m.
Taggart Rooms, Holiday Inn
1701 Sheridan Ave., Cody, WY 82414

Saturday: 9 a.m.–3 p.m.
Heart Mountain Interpretive Center
1539 Road 19, Powell, WY 82435

Web: heartmountain.org/pilgrimage.html
Phone: 307.754.8000

 

Las Vegas Buddhist Sanga Obon Bon Odori and Bazaar Festival

August 4, 2018
10 a.m.–4 p.m.
FREE and open to the public

Clark High School
4291 Pennwood Ave
Las Vegas, NV 89102

Web: lasvegasbuddhist.org

 

J-Sei

September 29 – October 7, 2018
FREE and open to the public

Saturday–Sunday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Monday–Friday: 2 p.m.–5 p.m. and by appointment

1285 66th St.
Emeryville, CA 94608

Web: j-sei.org
Phone: 510.654.4000

 

Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center

November 1–4, 2018
Included with museum admission

Thursday: 11 a.m.–7 p.m. • FREE
Friday–Saturday: 11 a.m.–3 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m.–3 p.m.

121 NW 2nd Ave.
Portland, OR 97209

Web: oregonnikkei.org
Phone: 503.224.1458

 

NVC Hall

November 24–25, 2018
10 a.m.–5 p.m.
FREE and open to the public

1212 S. King St.
Seattle, WA 98144

Web: nvcfoundation.org
Email: debbiekashino@gmail.com

 

History Colorado Center

February 15–17, 2019
10 a.m.–5 p.m.
FREE and open to the public*

1200 N. Broadway
Denver, CO 80203

Web: historycolorado.org
Phone: 303.447.8679

*Contested Histories and JACL Day of Remembrance events are free to the public; museum admission is required to view additional exhibit galleries.

 

2019 Jerome/Rohwer Pilgrimage

April 12, 2019
9 a.m.–6 p.m.; workshop: 10–10:30 a.m.
(Pilgrimage dates: April 11–13)

Open only to pilgrimage attendees.
Contact kimiko.marr@gmail.com to register. Registration closes March 15.

Comfort Inn & Suites Presidential
707 Interstate 30
Little Rock, AR 72202

 

Nihon Matsuri

Saturday, April 27, 2019
10 a.m.–5 p.m.
FREE and open to the public

100 South between 2nd West and 3rd West
Salt Lake City, UT

Web: nihonmatsuri.com

 

Midwest Buddhist Temple

Friday, May 17, 2019
10:45 a.m.–5 p.m.
FREE and open to the public

435 W. Menomonee
Chicago, IL 60614

Web: mbtchicago.org/2019-contested-histories
Phone: 312.943.7801

FINDING HOME (Re)Building a community in the Second City
Contested Histories will be available to view as part of the Finding Home programming Saturday–Sunday, May 18–19, 2019. All activities FREE and open to the public. Click here for schedule of events.

 

Seabrook Educational and Cultural Center

July 20–21, 2019
FREE and open to the public

Saturday: 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m.–3 p.m.

1323 Hwy 77
Bridgeton, NJ

Web: seabrookeducation.org
Phone: 856.451.8393

Contested Histories is being presented in conjunction with the Seabrook Buddhist Temple’s 74th Annual Obon Festival on July 20. Click here for more details.

 

National Museum of American History

Wednesday, February 19, 2020
10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
FREE and open to the public*

Constitution Avenue, NW
Between 12th and 14th Streets
Washington, DC

Web: americanhistory.si.edu
Phone: 202.633.1000

*Contested Histories is presented in conjunction with the Day of Remembrance Panel Discussion—Not for Sale: Preserving and Sharing a Community Collection at the National Museum of American History on February 19, 6 p.m.–8 p.m. Click here for details.

2018年01月07日-04月08日

Now Traveling!

Check the Venues page to see where the pop-up display is traveling.

Interested in booking this display? JANM is currently looking for locations in the central valley of California, San Diego county, and parts of Arizona. Download the Contested Histories travel fact sheet or email Clement Hanami at chanami@janm.org for more information.

 

Allen Hendershott Eaton’s historic 1952 book, Beauty Behind Barbed Wire: The Arts of the Japanese in Our War Relocation Camps, explored art and craft objects created by persons of Japanese descent while wrongfully incarcerated in the World War II American concentration camps. It was one of the first books to examine any aspect of the lives of the 120,000 inmates. In the course of conducting research for the book and a never-realized exhibition of camp artifacts, Eaton amassed a significant personal collection of such artifacts.

After many years of lying forgotten in storage, the collection was inherited by a family friend of Eaton’s, who in April 2015 attempted to put it up for auction. An outcry arose from Japanese American community leaders and activists, who rallied successfully to stop the insensitive sale of these important artifacts of Japanese American history. Ultimately, the collection was transferred to the Japanese American National Museum for safekeeping

The display includes physical or digital representation of every item in the collection—more than 400 individual photographs, sculptures, paintings and watercolors, jewelry items, vases, beads, nameplates, and other items handmade by Japanese Americans while enduring incarceration in the WWII camps. In addition to providing the opportunity to see a collection that inspired strong emotions and decisive actions within the Japanese American community, Contested Histories is intended to help gather information about each individual object so that the museum’s efforts to preserve and catalog the collection can be as complete as possible. Camp survivors and their family members and friends will be encouraged to share with JANM information they know or remember about the objects, including who is depicted in the many photographs, most of which were shot by photographers working for the War Relocation Authority.

A pop-up version of Contested Histories is now traveling to other locations in the United States for additional viewing and information gathering. Workshops will be presented in conjunction with the display at some locations. Please check the Venues page for confirmed locations and dates.

Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection was on display at the Japanese American National Museum January 7 – April 8, 2018.

The material in this pop-up display is based upon work assisted by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

 

View pre-conservation photography of the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection on Flickr. Those with information about the origins of specific items are encouraged to share at this link.

View Now

This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Additional support was provided by George and Brad Takei, the Earle K. & Katherine F. (Muto) Moore Foundation, and Richard Sakai.

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo

 

#ContestedHistories

2018年01月07日-04月08日

Now Traveling!

Check the Venues page to see where the pop-up display is traveling.

Interested in booking this display? JANM is currently looking for locations in the central valley of California, San Diego county, and parts of Arizona. Download the Contested Histories travel fact sheet or email Clement Hanami at chanami@janm.org for more information.

 

Allen Hendershott Eaton’s historic 1952 book, Beauty Behind Barbed Wire: The Arts of the Japanese in Our War Relocation Camps, explored art and craft objects created by persons of Japanese descent while wrongfully incarcerated in the World War II American concentration camps. It was one of the first books to examine any aspect of the lives of the 120,000 inmates. In the course of conducting research for the book and a never-realized exhibition of camp artifacts, Eaton amassed a significant personal collection of such artifacts.

After many years of lying forgotten in storage, the collection was inherited by a family friend of Eaton’s, who in April 2015 attempted to put it up for auction. An outcry arose from Japanese American community leaders and activists, who rallied successfully to stop the insensitive sale of these important artifacts of Japanese American history. Ultimately, the collection was transferred to the Japanese American National Museum for safekeeping

The display includes physical or digital representation of every item in the collection—more than 400 individual photographs, sculptures, paintings and watercolors, jewelry items, vases, beads, nameplates, and other items handmade by Japanese Americans while enduring incarceration in the WWII camps. In addition to providing the opportunity to see a collection that inspired strong emotions and decisive actions within the Japanese American community, Contested Histories is intended to help gather information about each individual object so that the museum’s efforts to preserve and catalog the collection can be as complete as possible. Camp survivors and their family members and friends will be encouraged to share with JANM information they know or remember about the objects, including who is depicted in the many photographs, most of which were shot by photographers working for the War Relocation Authority.

A pop-up version of Contested Histories is now traveling to other locations in the United States for additional viewing and information gathering. Workshops will be presented in conjunction with the display at some locations. Please check the Venues page for confirmed locations and dates.

Contested Histories: Art and Artifacts from the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection was on display at the Japanese American National Museum January 7 – April 8, 2018.

The material in this pop-up display is based upon work assisted by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

 

View pre-conservation photography of the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection on Flickr. Those with information about the origins of specific items are encouraged to share at this link.

View Now

This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Additional support was provided by George and Brad Takei, the Earle K. & Katherine F. (Muto) Moore Foundation, and Richard Sakai.

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo

 

#ContestedHistories

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