JANM Group Visits

団体での来館

Education Group Visits

日系アメリカ人の豊かな経験を伝えます。

シニアや大人、大学生、小中学生向けの団体向けのガイドツアーおよびセルフガイド見学のご予約を受け付けています。日本語ガイドツアーもご利用いただけます。

Education Notice

来館についてのお知らせ

当館のCOVID-19感染防止方針に則り、団体での来館のご予約は受け付けておりません。

随時、最新情報をアップデートいたします。ご質問がございましたら、groupvisits@janm.orgまでご連絡ください。

Planning your visit

Plan your group’s JANM visit to explore stories about the Japanese American experience.

Policies and Visiting Info

FAQ

Have questions? Here are answers to the most common inquiries.

View FAQ

Education Resources

Prepare for your visit to JANM by exploring resources prepared by JANM’s Education Unit.

Explore

その他の来館方法

Virtual

バーチャル訪問

バーチャル訪問では、ビデオ会議システムを通して、一般来館者や生徒に全米日系人博物館のコレクションに触れていただきます。歴史の大切な教訓が忘れ去られてしまわないよう、伝えていくための新たな方法です。

さらに詳しく

School Visits Students with geta

スクールプログラム

全米日系人博物館を訪れた生徒たちは、日系アメリカ人の物語と、その物語が今日に持つ意味を学びます。

さらに詳しく

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group-visits-policy

Group Visits’ Policies and Procedures

Admission

Adult and senior groups of 10 or more receive an admission discount: $10/adult, $6/senior.

To qualify for group rates, groups must schedule their visit in advance through the Education Unit. Admission rates are subject to change. Cash, checks, and credit cards are accepted. Group payment is due upon arrival. 

Cancellations

Call 213.625.0414 or email groupvisits@janm.org.

Contact the Education Unit immediately if your group must cancel. If you cancel well in advance, your spot can be offered to other visitors. If your group expects to be delayed, please call to inform us of your estimated arrival time. We may not be able to accommodate groups arriving more than 20 minutes late.
 

Parking

Please check Metro.net for a list of local parking lots. From the Regional Connector Transit Project page, in the sidebar menu, under “Maps,” click on “Little Tokyo Parking Facilities” to view a list of locations.

Public Transportation

JANM is easily accessible by public transportation, including the Dash and Metro lines. Union Station is a 15-minute walk or a short ride on a Dash bus. Contact your local public transportation agency for bus routes, times, and fees: ladottransit.com/dash, metro.net.

Due to ongoing construction of the Metro Regional Connector, there may be changes to schedules and routes. Please check their websites for updated information.

Accessibility

The Japanese American National Museum is fully accessible. Please notify the Education Unit of any special needs when you make your reservation.

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faq

FAQ

Do you have a place where we can eat lunch?

JANM does not have group dining facilities. Small groups are welcome to sit on the plaza outside of the museum to enjoy their lunches or order food from any number of restaurants in the Little Tokyo area. A list of restaurants can be provided upon request.

Do you have a place to store personal belongings?

Large bags and food items are not allowed in exhibition areas. We recommend leaving these items at home.

A limited number of self-serve storage lockers (9"W x 22"H x 16"D) available on a first-come basis. Valid ID required to use lockers. JANM cannot hold any jackets, clothing, or bags.

Do you have docents who are veterans or former inmates that we can talk to?

Our volunteer docents and facilitators may not be on-site for your visit. If you wish to speak to a volunteer through a virtual platform, please submit a reservation request for a Virtual Visits experience.

Many of our docents have first-hand experience with the American concentration camps. We cannot guarantee, however, that your group will be led by a WWII veteran or former camp inmate. All of our volunteers are well-trained and will be able to provide their own unique perspectives. To access oral histories online, visit DiscoverNikkei.org.

Do you have Japanese-speaking docents?

Japanese language tours will not be offered until further notice. Please check the visitors’ policies on our website to purchase general admission tickets or make a self-guided group reservation.

Why does JANM use the term “concentration camp” when speaking of the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans?

The terms used to describe what happened to 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II—relocation, evacuation, incarceration, internment, or concentration camp—vary among scholars, government officials, and even Japanese Americans themselves. While most people associate “concentration camp” with the Holocaust and many Americans feel more comfortable with milder terms like internment camps, JANM uses the term “concentration camp” because by definition a concentration camp is a place where people are imprisoned not because they are guilty of any crimes, but simply because of who they are. The U.S. government, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt, used the phrase “concentration camp” in speeches and written documents during World War II.

日系アメリカ人の経験に対する理解と社会的認識を深めていくため、当館にご支援をお願いいたします。

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