Image of hourglass diary scene in A Life in Pieces: The Diary and Letters of Stanley Hayami

開催中の展覧会

A Life in Pieces: The Diary and Letters of Stanley Hayami

Stanley Hayami was an ordinary American teenager from Mark Keppel High School in Alhambra, Calif. who enjoyed writing and sketching in his diary. Born on December 23, 1925, he was the son of Frank Naoichi and Asano Hayami. Stanley was the second youngest of four children, and in 1941, he was living the life of an average teenager in San Gabriel, Calif.

The December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack by Japan forever altered the life of Japanese Americans on the West Coast. A few months later, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the exclusion, forced removal, and unconstitutional incarceration of people of Japanese ancestry living on the west coast of the United States, two-thirds of whom were American citizens by birth. 

Executive Order 9066 forced the entire Hayami family to leave their San Gabriel home and nursery business. They were incarcerated first at the Pomona Assembly Center in California, and then later sent to Heart Mountain concentration camp in Wyoming. 

Imprisoned at the age of 16, Stanley wrote and sketched in his journal about school and his dreams of becoming an artist/writer. The young teen’s words and artwork are a window into his everyday life and feelings. Stanley opens up about his family’s incarceration, the military draft, and the importance of serving his country. 

Stanley’s Diary, February 12, 1943:
Last Tuesday I went to a meeting held by the army concerning…voluntary enlistment…. A lot of people wanted to know if they could have some guarantees so that after the war was over, they wouldn’t have their citizenship taken away…. He says…it’ll show that we are truly Americans, because we volunteered despite the kicking around that we got. On the other hand however…if we all do not volunteer(ed) …. Instead of improving our relations with the other Americans it would make it worse.

 

In 1944, Stanley was drafted into the U.S. Army’s 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the segregated, Japanese American unit that would become the most decorated unit in U.S. history for its size and length of service. 

Many young Japanese American men like Stanley, were drafted or volunteered for the military, leaving behind their families in camp.

Stanley’s letters home to his family reveal the hardships from the European front lines, while also keeping a positive outlook, so as not to worry his parents.

At the age of 19, Stanley is killed in northern Italy while trying to rescue a fellow soldier during combat. His legacy lives on through his diary, art, and letters donated to JANM by his family.

 

The Stanley Hayami Collection

Explore pages from Stanley Hayami’s 96-page diary, which he kept from 1941 to 1944. He explores a range of youthful thoughts and dreams—from becoming an artist-writer, longing for his San Gabriel, Calif. home, to the meaning of democracy. The diary includes his pen and ink drawings. 

VIEW COLLECTION

2021年07月09日-2022年01月09日

全米日系人博物館

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

ロサンゼルス生まれのスタンリー・ハヤミはごく普通のアメリカのティーンエイジャーです。アルハンブラのマーク・ケッペル高校に通い、学校の様子やアーティストや作家になる夢を日記に綴っていました。しかし時は1942年、彼は家族と共にワイオミング州のハートマウンテン強制収容所に送られるのです。十代のスタンリーが記した言葉やスケッチは、まるで窓のように彼の日常生活や感情を切り取っています。その中でスタンリーは家族の収容や徴兵、国のために戦うことの意義について赤裸々に語っています。

1944年、スタンリーはアメリカ陸軍第442連隊戦闘団に徴兵されました。この日系人部隊は、その規模と従軍期間においてアメリカ史上最も多くの勲章に輝いた部隊です。彼が家族に送った手紙には、ヨーロッパ戦線での苦難が打ち明けてはいるものの、両親を心配させないよう努めて明るいトーンで綴られています。スタンリーは19歳の時、イタリアで戦闘中に仲間を救出しようとして命を落としました。それでもスタンリーのレガシーは、遺族からJANMに寄贈された日記やアート、手紙などを通して生き続けています。

「粉々になった生:スタンリー・ハヤミの日記と手紙」展では、スタンリーが収容所で書いた文章や戦時中の手紙が、スマートフォンやモバイル機器でアクセスできるインタラクティブな360度映像として甦ります。またインタラクティブ要素のない映像は、会場内のテラサキ・オリエンテーション・シアターで上映しています。バーチャルリアリティ(VR)バージョンは、時間指定で体験いただけますが、数に限りがあるため予約を推奨しています(チケットの予約について)。このほかスタンリーのアート作品、日記、手紙の実物なども会場に並びます。

「粉々になった生:スタンリー・ハヤミの日記と手紙」は、エンブレマティック社のノニー・デ・ラ・ペニャと、シャロン・ヤマトが、全米日系人博物館と共同で制作したものです。この作品は2021年のトライベッカ映画祭のイマーシブ部門で6月9日にワールドプレミア上映が行われました。

この展覧会の詳細は、よくある質問をご覧ください。

 

スポンサー:

  • U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program 
  • The California Civil Liberties Public Education Program 

下記の皆様からもご支援をいただきました:

  • The Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation
  • Department of Cultural Affairs, Los Angeles
  • California Humanities
  • The Kosasa Foundation
  • Pasadena Arts Alliance

 

メディア・スポンサー:  The Rafu Shimpo

2021年07月09日-2022年01月09日

全米日系人博物館

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

ロサンゼルス生まれのスタンリー・ハヤミはごく普通のアメリカのティーンエイジャーです。アルハンブラのマーク・ケッペル高校に通い、学校の様子やアーティストや作家になる夢を日記に綴っていました。しかし時は1942年、彼は家族と共にワイオミング州のハートマウンテン強制収容所に送られるのです。十代のスタンリーが記した言葉やスケッチは、まるで窓のように彼の日常生活や感情を切り取っています。その中でスタンリーは家族の収容や徴兵、国のために戦うことの意義について赤裸々に語っています。

1944年、スタンリーはアメリカ陸軍第442連隊戦闘団に徴兵されました。この日系人部隊は、その規模と従軍期間においてアメリカ史上最も多くの勲章に輝いた部隊です。彼が家族に送った手紙には、ヨーロッパ戦線での苦難が打ち明けてはいるものの、両親を心配させないよう努めて明るいトーンで綴られています。スタンリーは19歳の時、イタリアで戦闘中に仲間を救出しようとして命を落としました。それでもスタンリーのレガシーは、遺族からJANMに寄贈された日記やアート、手紙などを通して生き続けています。

「粉々になった生:スタンリー・ハヤミの日記と手紙」展では、スタンリーが収容所で書いた文章や戦時中の手紙が、スマートフォンやモバイル機器でアクセスできるインタラクティブな360度映像として甦ります。またインタラクティブ要素のない映像は、会場内のテラサキ・オリエンテーション・シアターで上映しています。バーチャルリアリティ(VR)バージョンは、時間指定で体験いただけますが、数に限りがあるため予約を推奨しています(チケットの予約について)。このほかスタンリーのアート作品、日記、手紙の実物なども会場に並びます。

「粉々になった生:スタンリー・ハヤミの日記と手紙」は、エンブレマティック社のノニー・デ・ラ・ペニャと、シャロン・ヤマトが、全米日系人博物館と共同で制作したものです。この作品は2021年のトライベッカ映画祭のイマーシブ部門で6月9日にワールドプレミア上映が行われました。

この展覧会の詳細は、よくある質問をご覧ください。

 

スポンサー:

  • U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program 
  • The California Civil Liberties Public Education Program 

下記の皆様からもご支援をいただきました:

  • The Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation
  • Department of Cultural Affairs, Los Angeles
  • California Humanities
  • The Kosasa Foundation
  • Pasadena Arts Alliance

 

メディア・スポンサー:  The Rafu Shimpo

日系アメリカ人の経験に対する理解と社会的認識を深めていくため、当館にご支援をお願いいたします。

会員になる 寄附をする