default hero

Lectures & Discussions

Traditions and Craft in Japanese "Moku-hanga"

About the Event

Master printer Paul Mullowney will lead a hands-on workshop on creating woodblock prints, including an introduction to the history of its connection to ukiyo-e prints, Japanese tattoo imagery, and the 20th century sosaku hanga (creative prints) of leading figures like Shikoh Munakata.

In the spirit of the exhibition, Perseverance, the workshop will focus on the crossover shared between the traditions of tattooing and woodblock printing in 18th and 19th century Japan. It is often forgotten in contemporary Japan that the rich image bank coming from kabuki and Noh drama, Buddhism, Shintoism, and Japanese folk stories was shared by artists working in both worlds—tattooing and fine art prints. In this workshop, a brief historical overview of the methods, trends and iconography in the long traditions of the woodcut medium will be discussed

Participants will then have a chance to try their hand at carving and printing blocks using the techniques of Japanese water based printing. Pre-carved blocks will be available for printing on fine handmade papers and participants will be able to achieve fine results to take with them.

$50 members; $60 non-members, incl. admission & supplies. RSVP early, 25 participants max. Recommended for adults. Workshop includes one hour break.


Paul Mullowney, master printer in etching and woodcut, spent over ten years in Japan where he ran his own print studio in a 17th century Zen temple in the mountains of Nara where he and his wife and six cats were caretakers. He currently runs Mullowney Printing in San Francisco, a fine art, educational and publishing print studio in the Mission District.

Saturday, May 31, 2014

11:00 AM - 3:00 PM PDT

About the Event

Share
Master printer Paul Mullowney will lead a hands-on workshop on creating woodblock prints, including an introduction to the history of its connection to ukiyo-e prints, Japanese tattoo imagery, and the 20th century sosaku hanga (creative prints) of leading figures like Shikoh Munakata.

In the spirit of the exhibition, Perseverance, the workshop will focus on the crossover shared between the traditions of tattooing and woodblock printing in 18th and 19th century Japan. It is often forgotten in contemporary Japan that the rich image bank coming from kabuki and Noh drama, Buddhism, Shintoism, and Japanese folk stories was shared by artists working in both worlds—tattooing and fine art prints. In this workshop, a brief historical overview of the methods, trends and iconography in the long traditions of the woodcut medium will be discussed

Participants will then have a chance to try their hand at carving and printing blocks using the techniques of Japanese water based printing. Pre-carved blocks will be available for printing on fine handmade papers and participants will be able to achieve fine results to take with them.

$50 members; $60 non-members, incl. admission & supplies. RSVP early, 25 participants max. Recommended for adults. Workshop includes one hour break.


Paul Mullowney, master printer in etching and woodcut, spent over ten years in Japan where he ran his own print studio in a 17th century Zen temple in the mountains of Nara where he and his wife and six cats were caretakers. He currently runs Mullowney Printing in San Francisco, a fine art, educational and publishing print studio in the Mission District.

Support the understanding and appreciation of the Japanese American experience.

Become a Member Make a Gift