Dreams to Dreams

Special Display

Dreams to Dreams

Artist Interpretations

The Japanese American National Museum in association with Dacosta of Chocolate Soop brought together artists who customized Chocolate Soop’s DCTO (Dream Come True Object), a futuristic vinyl version of the traditional Japanese daruma.

Check out the photos below to view the various artists’ interpretations. A few of the pieces are available to purchase at the JANM Store.

 

Tako Rikishi (Octopus Sumo) by Joel Nakamura

Tako Rikishi (Octopus Sumo)

Joel Nakamura

Santa Fe, NM

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Born sometime between the Korean War and the Bay of Pigs in the City of Los Angeles, Joel Nakamura is a graduate of the world-renowned Art Center College of Design in Pasadena where he later became an instructor.

He, his wife Kathleen, and their two children live about 10 minutes south of Santa Fe Plaza. His work has been featured in newspapers and magazines across the United States. He has been the subject of numerous one-man shows, with his home gallery Hahn-Ross on Canyon Road in Santa Fe.

Polymers, 8"H.

 

Fire Ants Pants by Camilla d'Errico

Fire Ants Pants

Camilla d’Errico

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Canadian-Italian artist Camilla d’Errico’s client list includes Dark Horse Comics, Image Comics, Random House, Tokyopop, Hasbro, Disney, Sanrio, Neil Gaiman, and she also works with video game and movie companies on character development. Her own characters and properties, Tanpopo and Helmetgirls, are loved by fans and followers and now inspire Cosplay costumes.

Acrylic 8"H.

 

Glucose Dreams by Megz Majewski

Glucose Dreams

Megz Majewski

Calgary, AB, Canada

Majewski enjoys bringing life to characters on-screen, but her true passion is painting those that do not possess life. Her first solo art show was an incredible accomplishment: she successfully created 100 paintings in 100 days. The positive response to her art has inspired her to keep painting ghoulish vixens and zombie-eyed sweethearts, especially for little girls whose dollies have only one eye.

Acrylic 8"H.

 

Karada Bijutsu (Body Art) by Joel Nakamura

Karada Bijutsu (Body Art)

Joel Nakamura

Santa Fe, NM

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Born sometime between the Korean War and the Bay of Pigs in the City of Los Angeles, Joel Nakamura is a graduate of the world-renowned Art Center College of Design in Pasadena where he later became an instructor.

He, his wife Kathleen, and their two children live about 10 minutes south of Santa Fe Plaza. His work has been featured in newspapers and magazines across the United States. He has been the subject of numerous one-man shows, with his home gallery Hahn-Ross on Canyon Road in Santa Fe.

Polymers and ink, 8"H.

 

Time + Perseverance x Open Mind = Hope by Kazumi Kobayashi Svenson

Time + Perseverance x Open Mind = Hope

Kazumi Kobayashi Svenson

Wrightwood, CA

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Vinyl and hand-blown glass, 8"H.

 

 

 

Future Hope by David Svenson

Future Hope

David Svenson

Wrightwood, CA

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Svenson’s medium of choice is usually neon or wood. Exhibiting widely, he creates whimsical, glowing sculptures which are often Japanese-themed. He’s also a teacher and lecturer, and is on the board of the Museum of Neon Art, Los Angeles.

Vinyl, Bondo, and paint.

 

Airborne One by Donna Ikkanda

Airborne One

Donna Ikkanda

Los Angeles, CA

swirling, floating
dreams are autumn leaves falling
from a tree still full

Growing up in West Los Angeles, this Sansei artist studied Fine Arts at UCLA in the late 1960s and early ’70s, but her greatest artistic influences can be drawn within her own cultural background. “No matter what the subject matter, traditional Japanese art always combines all these elements in a way which is simultaneously dynamic, graceful, rich, deep, clean, and pure. It’s a very strong visual tradition.“

Mixed media, 8"H.

 

Airborne Too by Donna Ikkanda

Airborne Too

Donna Ikkanda

Los Angeles, CA

to sing while soaring
sunlight defines each feather
untethered spirit

Growing up in West Los Angeles, this Sansei artist studied Fine Arts at UCLA in the late 1960s and early ’70s, but her greatest artistic influences can be drawn within her own cultural background. “No matter what the subject matter, traditional Japanese art always combines all these elements in a way which is simultaneously dynamic, graceful, rich, deep, clean, and pure. It’s a very strong visual tradition.“

Mixed media, 8"H.

 

Mouth by Yoshii

Mouth

Yoshii

Tokyo, Japan

Yoshii is an acclaimed digital artist in Japan. He is a pioneer in the use of Corel Painter to make digital images in the Japanese illustration world. He freelanced as an illustrator and created various characters for major TV programs, commercials, corporate websites, campaigns, and events. Yoshii specializes in crystallizing characters for his clients’ needs with little direction.

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

Okasane Darumikan by Qris Yamashita

Okasane Darumikan

Qris Yamashita

Los Angeles, CA

While meditating Daruma once fell asleep and was so angry with himself that he ripped off his eyelids so he would never sleep again. Where his eyelids fell, the first tea bushes grew; and when monks brewed the leaves of the bush it enabled them to stay awake through their own meditations.

Yamashita is well known in the community not only for her superb graphic design skills and spirited taiko drumming, but over the years she has produced a series of beautiful mochitsuki posters, which are reflected in this homage to the daruma.

Mixed media, 20"H including stem.

 

Coatl de Oro by Jesse Hernandez

Coatl de Oro

Jesse Hernandez

Concord, CA

An urban vinyl artist from the Bay area, Jesse counts among his heroes: Crazy Horse, Geronimo, Che Guevara, Cesar Chavez, Santana, Roman Nose, and Bob Marley.

Spray paint and enamel, 8"H.

 

 

Karma Dreams by Neal Yamamoto

Karma Dreams

Neal Yamamoto

Los Angeles, CA

Enamel paint, 8"H.

 

 

 

The Fecund DCTO by Steve Talkowski

The Fecund DCTO

Steve Talkowski

Brooklyn, NY

Acrylic paint and paint markers, 8"H.

 

 

 

Inner Truth by Gary Van Der Steur

Inner Truth

Gary van der Steur

Los Angeles, CA

Gary is a designer/illustrator and occasional fine artist who lives and works in Los Angeles. In his spare time he dabbles in composing music. He has many clients in the non-profit world.

Iron, leather, bitumen, unidentified materials, 8"H.

 

Prototype DCTO, Mark 1 by Charles Hui (Chuckboy)

Prototype DCTO, Mark 1

Charles Hui (Chuckboy)

Los Angeles, CA

Chrome paint, metal rivets, and styrene plastic, 8"H.

 

 

 

Haragei (Center of Experience) by Joel Nakamura

Haragei (Center of Experience)

Joel Nakamura

Santa Fe, NM

Born sometime between the Korean War and the Bay of Pigs in the City of Los Angeles, Joel Nakamura is a graduate of the world-renowned Art Center College of Design in Pasadena where he later became an instructor.

He, his wife Kathleen, and their two children live about 10 minutes south of Santa Fe Plaza. His work has been featured in newspapers and magazines across the United States. He has been the subject of numerous one-man shows, with his home gallery Hahn-Ross on Canyon Road in Santa Fe.

Polymers, 8"H.

 

k-wing rebel by kaNO kid

k-wing rebel

kaNO kid

Elmhurst, NY

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

 

 

Nest by Julie West

Nest

Julie West

Derby, UK

Paint, sticks, and bird, 8"H.

 

 

 

The Dream Machine by Judson Beaumont

The Dream Machine

Judson Beaumont

Vancouver, BC, Canada

“When I first saw Dacosta’s Daruma, I loved the overall shape of it. I began toying with different ideas and concepts but eventually ended up at the idea of transforming it into a car. I wanted to try something different and being that the show is in Los Angeles, I wanted to pay homage to the huge car customizing culture in LA, which I have always been a big fan of. I named this piece the Dream Machine, let’s see where it will go.” —Judson

Fiberglas, wood, paint, and fur, approx. 8"H.

 

Untitled by Koji Takei

Untitled

Koji Takei

Los Angeles, CA

Before transitioning to fine art, Koji owned and operated a successful graphic design firm in Los Angeles. He has received recognition for his work from many professional organizations including awards from New York Art Director’s Club, American Institute of Graphic Arts, Los Angeles Art Director’s Club, Communication Arts, and Society of Typographic Arts. His work has been published in Graphis MagazinePrint MagazineCommunication Arts, and various publications in Japan and South Korea.

Plaster and wood, 8"H.

 

Zen Cycle by Trevor McKay

Zen Cycle

Trevor McKay

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Acrylic and apoxie sculpt, 9"H.

 

 

 

Krust-aruma by Marilyn Frandsen

Krust-aruma

Marilyn Frandsen

Los Angeles, CA

Frandsen owns and operates the design studio in Hollywood that currently produces the incredibly over-the-top, uber-designed packaging for Fox’s The Simpsons™ DVDs, among other properties.

Mixed media, 10"H.

 

Pandaruma by Kazuko Shinoka

Pandaruma

Kazuko Shinoka

Los Angeles, CA

Fabric, stand, and bamboo vase, approx. 8"H.

 

 

 

White Dreams by Charuca

White Dreams

Charuca

Barcelona, Spain

Charuca.net is a design studio in Barcelona, Spain, created in 2004 and specializing in character design, toy design, identity, and illustration.

Mixed media, 8"H.

 

 

Totoro Jizou by Dacostal

Totoro Jizou

Dacosta!

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Acrylic, rigid foam, and apoxie.

 

 

 

My Favorite Neighbor by Lou Pimentel

My Favorite Neighbor

Lou Pimentel

Brooklyn, NY

Oil paint.

 

 

 

O.W.L. by Dan Goodsell

O.W.L.

Dan Goodsell

Los Angeles, CA

Goodsell is co-author of Krazy Kids Food and Taschen 2003; he is also the creator of Mr. Toast, Shaky Bacon, and a host of interesting friends.

Felt, 8"H.

 

 

The Earth by Itokin Park

The Earth

Itokin Park

Kanagawa, Japan

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

 

 

Untitled by Brent Nolasco

Untitled

Brent Nolasco

Allentown, PA

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

 

 

Mask by Stuart Rapeport

Mask

Stuart Rapeport

Los Angeles, CA

Latex paint, 8"H.

 

 

 

Untitled by Mark Nagata

Untitled

Mark Nagata

San Francisco, CA

V-Color paint, 8"H.

 

 

 

Untitled by Peter Taylor

Untitled

Peter Taylor

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Acrylic paint and gold leaf, 8"H.

 

 

 

Honey Crisp by Shawn O'Connor

Honey Crisp

Shawn O’Conner

Edmonton, AB, Canada

Acrylic and polymer paint.

 

 

 

Microgravity by Scott Wetterschneider

Microgravity

Scott Wetterschneider

Austin, TX

Acrylic

 

 

 

Portrait of Chicken Boy by Amy Inouye

Portrait of Chicken Boy

Amy Inouye

Los Angeles, CA

Crocheted cotton, 8"H.

 

 

 

Golden Eyed Innocence by Leecifer

Golden Eyed Innocence

Leecifer

Oakland, CA

Mixed media, 8"H.

 

 

 

Cotton Candy Scream by Cameron Tiede

Cotton Candy Scream

Cameron Tiede

Flower Mound, TX

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

 

 

Moon Watcher by Mark Pilon

Moon Watcher

Mark Pilon

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Every aspect of Pilon’s art is carefully computer drawn and then meticulously painted in acrylic layers, to give them a sharp, print-like synthetic quality. Mark has worked in magazine design for over 15 years as a designer and illustrator. His commercial clients include IKEA, Walgreens, the Sierra Club, and Virgin.

Acrylic, 8"H.

 

Nature Otokonoko by Christina Conway

Nature Otokonoko

Christina Conway

San Diego, CA

Conway is a San Diego based artist, curator, and teacher. She conceived and implemented the well received Kokeshi Custom Show at the Subtext Gallery in San Diego, and the show’s second iteration at the Japanese America National Museum in July 2009 as part of Kokeshi: From Folk Toy to Art Toy (a collaboration between JANM and the LATDA Museum).

Acrylic Paint, 8"H.

 

Little Treasure (Pirate) by PESKIMO

Little Treasure (Pirate)

PESKIMO

Bristol, UK

Peskimo is a illustration/design duo based in the U.K.

Acrylic paint markers, 8"H.

 

 

Ume Hime by Sachiho Hino

Ume Hime

Sachiho Hino

Torrance, CA

Paint and washi paper, 8"H.

 

 

 

Inner Glow / Outer Grow by Steve Rolston

Inner Glow / Outer Grow

Steve Rolston

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Acrylic paint, 8"H.

 

Artist Interpretations

December 02, 2008 - January 25, 2009

Japanese American National Museum

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Extended through January 25, 2009!

Artist Interpretations

Dreams to Dreams

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

The Japanese American National Museum in association with Dacosta of Chocolate Soop bring you the first custom vinyl toy show in a museum. 39 artists have customized Chocolate Soop’s DCTO (Dream Come True Object), a futuristic vinyl version of a traditional Japanese New Year’s folk toy.

DCTO (pronounced dik-toe) is an urban vinyl version of a daruma, symbol of the 5th century Buddhist monk who meditated so long he lost the use of his arms and legs. Daruma dolls come with unpainted eyes. The owner uses Daruma as a symbol of personal dedication to a new venture or new beginning. Painting in the left eye shows commitment to a goal; once the goal is achieved, you paint in the right eye.

 

Participating Artists

Angry Woebots • Barry Stephenson • Brent Nolasco • Cameron Tiede • Camilla d’Errico • Charles Hui • Charuca • Christina Conway • Dacosta • Dan Goodsell • David & Kazumi Svenson • Donna Ikkanda • Gary van der Steur • Hiroshi Yoshii • Itokin Park • Jesse Hernandez • Jester • Joel Nakamura • Judson Beaumont • Julie West • kaNO kid • Kazuko Shinoka (Spicy Brown) • Keith Poon • Koji Takei • Leecifer • MadL • Marilyn Frandsen • Mark Atomos • Mark Nagata • Megan Majewski • Neal Yamamoto • NEMO • PESKIMO • Peter Taylor • PON • Qris Yamashita • Sachiho Hino (Spicy Brown) • Scott Wetterschneider • Shawn O’Conner • Steve Rolston • Steve Talkowski • Stuart Rapeport • Trevor McKay

 

Extended through January 25, 2009!

Artist Interpretations

December 02, 2008 - January 25, 2009

Japanese American National Museum

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Extended through January 25, 2009!

Artist Interpretations

Dreams to Dreams

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

The Japanese American National Museum in association with Dacosta of Chocolate Soop bring you the first custom vinyl toy show in a museum. 39 artists have customized Chocolate Soop’s DCTO (Dream Come True Object), a futuristic vinyl version of a traditional Japanese New Year’s folk toy.

DCTO (pronounced dik-toe) is an urban vinyl version of a daruma, symbol of the 5th century Buddhist monk who meditated so long he lost the use of his arms and legs. Daruma dolls come with unpainted eyes. The owner uses Daruma as a symbol of personal dedication to a new venture or new beginning. Painting in the left eye shows commitment to a goal; once the goal is achieved, you paint in the right eye.

 

Participating Artists

Angry Woebots • Barry Stephenson • Brent Nolasco • Cameron Tiede • Camilla d’Errico • Charles Hui • Charuca • Christina Conway • Dacosta • Dan Goodsell • David & Kazumi Svenson • Donna Ikkanda • Gary van der Steur • Hiroshi Yoshii • Itokin Park • Jesse Hernandez • Jester • Joel Nakamura • Judson Beaumont • Julie West • kaNO kid • Kazuko Shinoka (Spicy Brown) • Keith Poon • Koji Takei • Leecifer • MadL • Marilyn Frandsen • Mark Atomos • Mark Nagata • Megan Majewski • Neal Yamamoto • NEMO • PESKIMO • Peter Taylor • PON • Qris Yamashita • Sachiho Hino (Spicy Brown) • Scott Wetterschneider • Shawn O’Conner • Steve Rolston • Steve Talkowski • Stuart Rapeport • Trevor McKay

 

Extended through January 25, 2009!

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