New Frontiers

Past Exhibition

NewFrontiers

Drawing of strange new worlds with blue borderJANM’s DiscoverNikkei.org website is a treasure trove of materials and resources on Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants) life, history, culture, and community around the world. It is a community-based project that partners with organizations and individuals throughout the Americas to share Nikkei-related community and personal stories, events, and more in four languages—English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese.

Check out the video interview clips and articles about George Takei on Discover Nikkei below.

March 12 - August 20, 2017

Japanese American National Museum

Five years drawn logo of a boyNew Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei explores the life and career of pioneering actor, activist, and social media icon George Takei, who currently serves on the Japanese American National Museum’s Board of Trustees. By examining Takei’s diverse experiences and achievements, this entertaining exhibition creates a portrait of a unique individual while offering an innovative means of engaging with the social history of America.

Takei has been an innovator on many fronts. Through a curated selection of his artifacts, New Frontiers captures a long and colorful life while also providing a space to reflect on some of the social and political changes that rippled through America during the 20th and 21st centuries. The exhibition begins with Takei’s childhood and his incarceration, along with his family, at the Rohwer and Tule Lake concentration camps during World War II. It then moves through his career as one of the first successful Japanese American actors in Hollywood; his public service appointments, including stints on the Southern California Rapid Transit District and the Japan–United States Friendship Commission; his coming out as a gay man and his celebrated marriage to longtime partner Brad Takei (née Altman); his ongoing activism on behalf of the Japanese American and LGBTQ communities; his wild popularity as a social media figure; and much more.

New Frontiers draws on the George and Brad Takei Collection, a treasure trove of personal artifacts recently donated to the Japanese American National Museum by the Takeis. The collection includes photographs, correspondence, scripts, awards, campaign materials from his 1973 Los Angeles City Council bid, and one-of-a-kind artworks made by his legions of fans. Of special note are a sculpture made from a swamp root by Takei’s father while the family was incarcerated during World War II at the Rohwer concentration camp in Arkansas; the walking stick Takei carried on his ascent of Mount Fuji in Japan; the Olympic torch he carried in the lead-up to the 1984 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles; and the key to the city of Roanoke, Virginia. Takei traveled to Roanoke in 2015 to meet with its mayor, David Bowers, after Bowers cited the use of Japanese American concentration camps to justify suspending the relocation of Syrian refugees to the city.

New Frontiers is curated by noted author, journalist, and cultural critic Jeff Yang.

Major Sponsors:

LA Department of Cultural Affairs green sponsor logoThe California Endowment logo

Kansas Marine Co.

 

Patron Sponsors:  

2016 Kokoro Boutique 

Rodenberry Foundation logo

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo 

March 12 - August 20, 2017

Japanese American National Museum

Five years drawn logo of a boyNew Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei explores the life and career of pioneering actor, activist, and social media icon George Takei, who currently serves on the Japanese American National Museum’s Board of Trustees. By examining Takei’s diverse experiences and achievements, this entertaining exhibition creates a portrait of a unique individual while offering an innovative means of engaging with the social history of America.

Takei has been an innovator on many fronts. Through a curated selection of his artifacts, New Frontiers captures a long and colorful life while also providing a space to reflect on some of the social and political changes that rippled through America during the 20th and 21st centuries. The exhibition begins with Takei’s childhood and his incarceration, along with his family, at the Rohwer and Tule Lake concentration camps during World War II. It then moves through his career as one of the first successful Japanese American actors in Hollywood; his public service appointments, including stints on the Southern California Rapid Transit District and the Japan–United States Friendship Commission; his coming out as a gay man and his celebrated marriage to longtime partner Brad Takei (née Altman); his ongoing activism on behalf of the Japanese American and LGBTQ communities; his wild popularity as a social media figure; and much more.

New Frontiers draws on the George and Brad Takei Collection, a treasure trove of personal artifacts recently donated to the Japanese American National Museum by the Takeis. The collection includes photographs, correspondence, scripts, awards, campaign materials from his 1973 Los Angeles City Council bid, and one-of-a-kind artworks made by his legions of fans. Of special note are a sculpture made from a swamp root by Takei’s father while the family was incarcerated during World War II at the Rohwer concentration camp in Arkansas; the walking stick Takei carried on his ascent of Mount Fuji in Japan; the Olympic torch he carried in the lead-up to the 1984 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles; and the key to the city of Roanoke, Virginia. Takei traveled to Roanoke in 2015 to meet with its mayor, David Bowers, after Bowers cited the use of Japanese American concentration camps to justify suspending the relocation of Syrian refugees to the city.

New Frontiers is curated by noted author, journalist, and cultural critic Jeff Yang.

Major Sponsors:

LA Department of Cultural Affairs green sponsor logoThe California Endowment logo

Kansas Marine Co.

 

Patron Sponsors:  

2016 Kokoro Boutique 

Rodenberry Foundation logo

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo 

Learn more about George Takei on Discover Nikkei

George Takei in a plaid collared shirt and jacket sits at a table for an interview

George Takei Interview

Watch clips from a 2015 video interview.

WATCH

Goldenrod background with a figure with black hair and Star Trek shirt depicting George Takei

George Takei is the Energizer Bunny of the JA community

Instead of fading into pop culture history after the Star Trek movies, George Takei has reinvented himself in both politics and pop culture, and today he’s hands-down the best-known and influential Asian American and an activist for human rights. (2017)

Read Now

Late Senator Daniel Inouye, Irene Hirano Inoouye, and George Takei all dressed formally and in black at the 2011 Gala Dinner

Distinguished Medal of Honor for Lifetime Achievement and Public Service: George Takei

George Takei’s public service efforts have reached far and wide, embracing a variety of communities, while deeply impacting the Japanese American community. He was honored by JANM in 2015.

Read Now

George Takei dressed in a black shirt and black leather jacket sits against a red "Midtown Comics" background while holding up a figurine of his Star Trek character

To Be Takei

Imagine—a musical about the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans? Actor, activist, and media personality George Takei has had an interesting life and as a “media superstar,” he continues his ambitious work on behalf of Japanese Americans/Japanese Canadians inspiring a new generation to ask questions. (2014)

Read Now

Flyer for Allegiance musical starring George Takei

George Takei’s Allegiance Is a Timely Historical Musical For Today

George Takei makes his Broadway debut in Allegiance, which tells the story of Japanese American incarceration during World War II and is inspired by the experience of his own family as a child. (2015)

Read Now

Woman in Hello Kitty "LOVE" tank top stands behind a table draped with rainbow origami cranes at Boston Pride

It's National Coming Out Day!—October 11

When I was looking around for famous LGBT Japanese Americans to mention when I came out to my parents, George Takei was the only one I came up with. (2014)

Read Now

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