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Past Exhibition

Kenjiro Nomura

An Artist's View of the Japanese American Internment

About this Exhibition

On April 30, 1942, Kenjiro Nomura, his wife, and son were forcibly removed from their homes in Seattle and incarcerated in the Puyallup Assembly Center. Eventually they were transported, along with nearly 10,000 other Japanese Americans to the Minidoka concentration camp in Hunt, Idaho. At the time of the removal, Nomura was already an established and prolific artist. He worked at various other jobs to support himself financially, including operating a sign painting shop in Seattle. At both Puyallup and Minidoka he worked again as a sign painter and created many images of camp life including landscapes and portraits of daily rituals. Nomura produced a visual record of his experiences with whatever materials he could find, often using industrial paints and government issued paper. This exhibition provides an opportunity to view a portion of this important collection of works.

About this Exhibition

October 04, 1997 - January 11, 1998

Japanese American National Museum

About this Exhibition

On April 30, 1942, Kenjiro Nomura, his wife, and son were forcibly removed from their homes in Seattle and incarcerated in the Puyallup Assembly Center. Eventually they were transported, along with nearly 10,000 other Japanese Americans to the Minidoka concentration camp in Hunt, Idaho. At the time of the removal, Nomura was already an established and prolific artist. He worked at various other jobs to support himself financially, including operating a sign painting shop in Seattle. At both Puyallup and Minidoka he worked again as a sign painter and created many images of camp life including landscapes and portraits of daily rituals. Nomura produced a visual record of his experiences with whatever materials he could find, often using industrial paints and government issued paper. This exhibition provides an opportunity to view a portion of this important collection of works.

About this Exhibition

October 04, 1997 - January 11, 1998

Japanese American National Museum

About this Exhibition

On April 30, 1942, Kenjiro Nomura, his wife, and son were forcibly removed from their homes in Seattle and incarcerated in the Puyallup Assembly Center. Eventually they were transported, along with nearly 10,000 other Japanese Americans to the Minidoka concentration camp in Hunt, Idaho. At the time of the removal, Nomura was already an established and prolific artist. He worked at various other jobs to support himself financially, including operating a sign painting shop in Seattle. At both Puyallup and Minidoka he worked again as a sign painter and created many images of camp life including landscapes and portraits of daily rituals. Nomura produced a visual record of his experiences with whatever materials he could find, often using industrial paints and government issued paper. This exhibition provides an opportunity to view a portion of this important collection of works.

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