Under a Mushroom Cloud: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb

Past Exhibition

Under a Mushroom Cloud

Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb

Seeds: A Message from Kaz

Seeds: A Message from Kaz is a short documentary that follows Kazuye Suyeishi (aka Kaz-mama), a Hiroshima A-bomb survivor and life-long peace activist. Born in the United States, Kaz-mama moved to Hiroshima as a child and survived the A-bomb blast when she was 18 years old. After the war, she returned to the United States and later dedicated her life to advocating for peace by talking about her A-bomb experience.

Produced by Miyuki Iwasaki and JANM’s Watase Media Arts Center. A short version of this film is being shown as part of Under a Mushroom Cloud: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb.

Interview footage of Kazuye Suyeishi for Seeds was provided by TSS-TV Co., Ltd. The documentary was funded by the Philip and Masako Togo Kasloff Foundation.

The film is also available in Japanese.

 

Passing the Legacy: Hiroshima and Nagasaki

On the opening day of Under a Mushroom Cloud: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb, JANM presented a special program moderated by JANM Vice President of Exhibitions Clement Hanami, whose own mother was an atomic bomb survivor. The program included presentations by Takuo Takigawa, Director of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum; and personal testimonies from two Japanese American survivors, Howard Kakita and Junji Sarashina.

 

Interview with Howard Kakita

View clips from a 2019 interview with Howard Kakita, a Japanese American who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

View the clips with interview transcripts on Discover Nikkei (in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese).

November 09, 2019 - July 25, 2021

Japanese American National Museum

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Special display of artifacts from atomic bomb victims on view through March 1, 2020.

To commemorate the upcoming 75th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Japanese American National Museum presents Under a Mushroom Cloud: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb, organized in partnership with the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Through March 1, 2020, the exhibition will include a special display of artifacts belonging to atomic bomb victims.

On August 6, 1945, the B-29 Enola Gay released “Little Boy,” a uranium bomb, upon the population of Hiroshima. Three days later, the B-29 Bockscar dropped “Fat Man,” a plutonium bomb, over Nagasaki. These two cities were the first in human history to experience the unparalleled power and devastation of atomic bombs. In a matter of seconds, the cities were destroyed and countless lives lost. The spirits and bodies of those who survived were deeply wounded and their pain continues to this day. Some of those survivors were second-generation Japanese Americans; when the bombs were dropped, thousands of Japanese Americans were living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and they were among the victims of the destruction.

In addition to photographs, explanatory texts, and artifacts belonging to bomb victims, Under a Mushroom Cloud will also include contemporary artworks that provide an array of perspectives on the effects of the atomic bombs and their impact on people today. The exhibition will shed light on this painful history and provide a safe space for discussion, in the hope that such an event never occurs to any person or country again.

Special display of artifacts from atomic bomb victims on view through March 1, 2020.

Premier Sponsors:
Mazda North American Operations logo Otafuku Sauce Co., LTD. logo

 

Additional support provided by The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles; the Hiroshima Peace Grant from the Hiroshima Peace Creation Fund; Wakunaga of America Co., Ltd.; and Philip and Masako Togo Kasloff Foundation.

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo 

 

November 09, 2019 - July 25, 2021

Japanese American National Museum

100 N. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Special display of artifacts from atomic bomb victims on view through March 1, 2020.

To commemorate the upcoming 75th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Japanese American National Museum presents Under a Mushroom Cloud: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Atomic Bomb, organized in partnership with the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Through March 1, 2020, the exhibition will include a special display of artifacts belonging to atomic bomb victims.

On August 6, 1945, the B-29 Enola Gay released “Little Boy,” a uranium bomb, upon the population of Hiroshima. Three days later, the B-29 Bockscar dropped “Fat Man,” a plutonium bomb, over Nagasaki. These two cities were the first in human history to experience the unparalleled power and devastation of atomic bombs. In a matter of seconds, the cities were destroyed and countless lives lost. The spirits and bodies of those who survived were deeply wounded and their pain continues to this day. Some of those survivors were second-generation Japanese Americans; when the bombs were dropped, thousands of Japanese Americans were living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and they were among the victims of the destruction.

In addition to photographs, explanatory texts, and artifacts belonging to bomb victims, Under a Mushroom Cloud will also include contemporary artworks that provide an array of perspectives on the effects of the atomic bombs and their impact on people today. The exhibition will shed light on this painful history and provide a safe space for discussion, in the hope that such an event never occurs to any person or country again.

Special display of artifacts from atomic bomb victims on view through March 1, 2020.

Premier Sponsors:
Mazda North American Operations logo Otafuku Sauce Co., LTD. logo

 

Additional support provided by The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles; the Hiroshima Peace Grant from the Hiroshima Peace Creation Fund; Wakunaga of America Co., Ltd.; and Philip and Masako Togo Kasloff Foundation.

 

Media Sponsor: The Rafu Shimpo 

 

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